Tony Becca: Who will be the kings of Eden Gardens?

first_img Batting powerhouse Quality hitting In a nutshell, the teams boast exciting batting, probably with the exception of India’s Virat Kohli, the best in Twenty20 cricket, and they bat deep, one parading a batting powerhouse capable of hitting many sixes and many fours, the other known for their elegant drives and cuts which race away to the boundary. In Gayle, especially, and Charles, Samuels, and Simmons, however, plus Bravo, Russell, Sammy, and Brathwaite, the West Indies boast a batting line-up which, although it always promises to hit the ball very far hard and very far, and when it does, it can be very destructive, it sometimes, and quite often, falls very short of its attempted distance or regularity. England, on the other hand, possess more controlled batting, the type which can sometimes be conservative, more reliable and productive. The batting on either side, but especially on the West Indies side, could, however, depend on the luck of the day, on the opposition’s fielding on the day, and on their bowling throughout the day. The West Indies bowling, which may be Samuel Badree, Russell, Bravo, Brathwaite, Sulieman Benn, and probably Gayle, may, but for Badree, and probably Benn, find the going rough. England’s attack of the left-handed David Willey, Chris Jordan, Liam Plunkett, Stokes, Moeen Ali, and Adil Rashid is a bit more skilful and devious. It could put the West Indies batsmen under pressure, especially because of their big-hitting and sometimes careless reputation. On the other hand, if they report to the Eden Gardens bubbling with confidence, the West Indies batsmen could easily rip them apart. Despite their lack of skill, however, the West Indies bowlers may dismantle England’s sometimes timid batting. The key to the West Indies bowling could well be Bravo. His slower, dipping deliveries can be deadly, if he gets them right. One thing is certain, the fielding on both sides will be extraordinary. England’s fielding, especially that of Stokes and Jordan, is good, and sometimes brilliant. The West Indies fielding, especially the catching of Russell, Bravo, and Sammy, is sometimes truly breathtaking. Based on the action which has gone before, today’s finals of the ICC World Twenty20 cricket tournaments at the beautiful Eden Gardens stadium in Kolkata promise to be a grand occasion to be played before an estimated 100,000 cheering spectators. The finalists are the West Indies and Australia in the women’s event, and the West Indies against England in the men’s final. And after the triumph of the young West Indians recently, it will be a great day for the West Indies, especially if they win one or both matches. The men’s final, however, is the stellar event, and however it goes, it should be a shoot-out to remember. It features some of the finest players, not only in the new, flashy, and exciting style of T20 cricket, but also some of the best in the longer, more traditional, and more celebrated format and representing the West Indies and England, two past champions. On one hand, representing the West Indies, the people’s favourite is Chris Gayle, the world’s most destructive batsman, a big left-hander with 98 sixes already in his bag, and he is backed up by a few others who fear no foe, by Johnson Charles, Marlon Samuels, Lendl Simmons, Dwayne Bravo, and others like Andre Russell, Darren Sammy, and Carlos Brathwaite. On the other hand, representing England, the founders of the game, is Joe Root, one of the world’s best batsman technically, an elegant, attractive, and confident right-hander with a pocketful of runs in his possession, and he is supported by a mixture of fine batsmen in the confident opening pair of Jason Roy and Alex Hales, the solid Eoin Morgan, the dashing and fearless all-rounder Ben Stokes, the attacking Jos Buttler, and a few others. The two teams, who lit up the tournament, one in 2010 and one in 2012, are desperate for success this time around. England are fighting to establish themselves, especially in this exciting format of the game, and the West Indies are determined to confirm their success in the T20 style as opposed to their struggling and disappointing form in the longer versions of the game. This tournament has been exciting and wonderful, and it has produced some lovely cricket. It has not produced too much of the hit-or-miss swinging while batting. It has produced some elegant and classical strokes, some quality hitting straight down the ground, some extraordinary fielding and catching, and some teasing and baffling right-arm leg-spin bowling instead of the fast and straight variety pitched just short-of-a-length. The spin bowling throughout the entire tournament has been good, the batting of Gayle, 100 off 48 deliveries against England, including 11 sixes, was exciting, and the batting of Kohli, 55 off 37 deliveries against Pakistan, 82 not out off 51 deliveries against Australia, and 89 not out off 47 deliveries against the West Indies were magnificent. The batting of Roy, 78 off 44 deliveries against New Zealand, was tasty, the batting of Buttler, 32 off 17 against New Zealand was delightful, the bowling of spinners Ish Sodhi and Mitchell Santner of New Zealand, throughout was impressive, the stumping of Sabbir Rahman by Mahendra Singh Dhoni off Suresh Raina against Bangladesh was almost unbelievable, and many of the catches were simply extraordinary. India’s comeback victory over Bangladesh in the last over at the end of the innings, as Bangladesh, needing one run to tie with three wickets in hand, lost to India by one run off the last delivery; India beat Australia off the last delivery with Dhoni hitting a six, and the West Indies defeated South Africa with two deliveries to spare were some of the thrilling moments of 2016. If Gayle, Samuels, Russell, Badree and company from the West Indies; and England’s Root, Stokes, Buttler, and Rashid parade their skills today, the Eden Gardens will be the place to be. The action should be exciting and extraordinary, and it may not really matter who wins. The tournament started with eight of the 16 teams very close and having an equal chance of victory, and it is finishing, after some thrilling and exciting matches, with two of them, the powerful, hard-hitting West Indies, and the conservative, easy-going England, boasting an equal chance of snatching victory, even though my favourites must be the West Indies, who have already beaten England. England go in with a thrilling victory over the previously unbeaten New Zealand, the West Indies with an exciting victory with two deliveries to spare.last_img read more

Guyana-Canada team up to boost oil and gas sector

first_imgOver 20 Canadian organisations experienced in the oil and gas sector are currently in Guyana having attended the Guyana Petroleum Business Summit and Exhibition (GIPEX) and are in talks with local businesses to develop the sector in the country.Caption: Representatives of some of the Canadian-based oil and gas companies along with Canadian High Commissioner, Lilian ChatterjeeThis announcement was made on Thursday evening at a reception hosted by Canadian High Commissioner, Lilian Chatterjee.  In her remarks, the High Commissioner noted that “Canada is one of the world’s principle energy producers with some of the world’s largest energy reserves; an industry that supports more than 500,000,000 direct and indirect jobs. There is lots of learning in the petroleum industry that can now boost world-class expertise in exploration and production.”High Commissioner Chatterjee remarked that the companies currently in Guyana are eager to share their knowledge and expertise with local businesses. She noted that oil and gas extraction has been Canada’s top export earner by value since 2005, adding that these businesses have vast background knowledge and experience in the sector.One of the recent business collaborations unveiled on Thursday evening is the ‘Guyana Strategic Services’ – a merger between local public relations firm, Sagacity Media, and Canadian consultancy, the Caron Hawco Group.The Caron Hawco Group is a communications, business and trade consultancy that specialises in the offshore oil and gas industry. The owner, Caron Hawco, stated “if you need to build your brand, make connections, if you want to know about trade if you want to know about Guyana and the oil and gas industry we offer those services” and noted that the Guyana Strategic Services will take the oil and gas industry by storm.The High Commissioner urged Guyanese companies to develop their manpower in order to benefit from the opportunities that will be made available.last_img read more

Russian team struggles to shape up ahead of finals

first_imgSince the arrival of the moustachioed strategist in August last year, the team continues to disappoint with rare victories dotted between defeats.“Landing in an easy group at the World Cup is an illusion,” Cherchesov said in an interview published by Russia’s Football Union.Out of 17 matches under his watch, Russia have won six and lost just as many, with some embarrassing defeats such as a 2-1 loss against Qatar in November 2016.The former international goalkeeper has tried to diversify the team’s tactics. But forcing older players to retire – a decision not welcomed by all fans – and blooding less experienced youngsters has failed to do the job.Even drafting in more foreign players has not improved the situation. Lokomotiv Moscow’s Brazilian keeper Guilherme Marinato debuted for his adopted homeland in 2016 after receiving Russian citizenship.He was followed by two German players of Russian origin, Roman Neustadter and Konstantin Rausch, as well as CSKA’s Brazilian midfielder Mario Fernandes, with the additions planned with 2018 in mind.– Young hopefuls –Russia’s coach Stanislav Cherchesov (L) leads the team ahead of a friendly match against Argentina, at the Luzhniki stadium in Moscow, on November 11, 2017 © AFP/File / Kirill KUDRYAVTSEVYet for outside observers, Russia remain an improving team. During Euro 2016 in France, six of Russia’s best players were over 30 and the team lacked any decent tactics or style.By integrating younger players with potential that his predecessor ignored, Cherchesov revitalised a group that can finally play as a team.During matches against Belgium and Spain this year, both of which ended in 3-3 draws, the Russians were able to recover from trailing by two goals.“I saw no fear in the eyes of the Russian players,” former CSKA Moscow coach Valery Gazzaev said of the games, adding that Russia “learned more from two matches against Argentina (a 1-0 loss) and Spain than from all previous friendly matches”.Cherchesov sees another reason for satisfaction.“When we talk about the players, we are still talking about football,” he explained, a few weeks after Zenit player Alexander Kokorin rejoined the national team.Kokorin, 26, was suspended in July 2016 after a video emerged from a Monte Carlo nightclub where he and team-mate Pavel Mamaev allegedly spent $296,000 on champagne following Russia’s humiliating Euro 2016 performance.Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov called it “a shameless display of conceit”. But 18 months later, Kokorin is enjoying his best season to date.– Aiming for the quarter-finals –The Russian team will kick off at the World Cup with some certainties. Cherchesov has already boasted about his defence, which will include Viktor Vasin (CSKA Moscow), Fedor Kudryashov (Rubin Kazan) and Georgiy Dzhikiya (Spartak Moscow).Veteran goalkeeper Igor Akinfeev, capped 113 times by Russia, will play alongside his CSKA Moscow team-mate Alan Dzagoev and Spartak Moscow midfielder Denis Glushakov.The arrival of the Miranchuk brothers, who both play for Lokomotiv Moscow, breathed new life into the team.Russia are waiting to see their best strikers Fedor Smolov (Krasnodar) and Kokorin finally be reunited on the pitch. Until now, Cherchesov has favoured the Krasnodar attacker.To test themselves, Russia will play another friendly against Brazil in March. They will also need to reconcile with their loyal, but disappointed supporters. In July 2016, 500,000 Russians signed an online petition to dissolve the national team.Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister Vitaly Mutko has set a goal of reaching the quarter-finals at next year’s tournament.That would already be an achievement, with Russia yet to advance beyond the first round in three World Cup appearances — in 1994, 2002 and 2014 — since the fall of the USSR.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Russia’s national football team head coach Stanislav Cherchesov leading a training session at Moscow’s Eduard Streltsov Stadium © AFP/File / Yuri KADOBNOVMOSCOW, Russian Federation, Nov 30 – Appointed as Russia’s new coach right after their Euro 2016 disaster, Stanislav Cherchesov knew he was facing an uphill task. Now he has seven months to turn next year’s World Cup hosts into viable opponents.Russia will take the top slot in the first pot of teams at the finals draw on Friday as hosts, but at 65th in the world they are the lowest ranked of the 32 nations taking part in next year’s tournament.last_img read more

UPDATED: PICKET AT CONRAD’S RESTAURANT POSPTONED – CHEF GIVEN 3 DAYS TO PAY UP!

first_imgTOP Donegal chef Conrad Gallagher is at the centre of an unpaid wages furore today.The Restaurant and Catering Workers Forum, established by SIPTU and Migrant Rights Centre Ireland (MRCI), was planningt a lunchtime ‘name and shame action’ today outside Conrad Gallagher’s restaurant, Salon des Saveurs on Aungier St, in support of a worker who is owed wages by the celebrity Donegal chef.However the protest was postponed – after protestors gave Gallagher until Monday to pay up! Rishi Mohiputlall, from Mauritius, worked in Mr Gallagher’s well known restaurant for over a month in 2010, and has still not been paid.Following numerous attempts to retrieve his wages, Mr Mohiputlall took a case under the Payment of Wages Act in the Labour Relations Commission.His complaint was upheld by the Rights Commissioner who required Mr Gallagher to pay Mr Mohiputlall his wages.Mr Mohiputlall has still not been paid, two years on.He told donegaldaily.com: “I have tried every avenue to get my wages from my former employer.“Today I am saying enough is enough, it is wrong to treat a worker, another human being this way. I did not sign up to work for free, and I am disgusted by the way that I have been treated by Conrad. I worked hard for him, all I want is what is owed to me”.Mr Mohiputlall continued: “I also want to take a stand so that other workers are encouraged to come forward and report these types of abuses.”Supporters will join Mr Mohiputlall outside the restaurant next week to show their solidarity if Mr Gallagher refuses to pay by a deadline set for next Monday.According to MRCI’s Helen Lowry: “Understandably, Rishi wants to be paid for the work he was employed to do in Salon Des Saveurs. As a member of the Restaurant and Catering Workers Forum he has asked for support to bring his case to public attention in the hope it will help him secure the money owed to him, but also to highlight such practices in the restaurant industry,”Ms Lowry added: “Restaurant industry representatives are out there trying to undermine workers’ terms and conditions, when their time would be better spent calling for minimum decent standards for those who cook and serve the food.  Exploitation in the restaurant industry is a real problem, as highlighted by NERA and ourselves.“This is the real issue that needs urgent attention.”Pat Ward of SIPTU told us: “This type of non-compliance is shameful, particularly at a time when the restaurant industry is driving an attack on minimum wages and basic protections for workers, while lower-wage workers are struggling to survive. Rishi’s experience shows that, now more than ever, we must ensure protections remain in place for those who need them most.”UPDATED: PICKET AT CONRAD’S RESTAURANT POSPTONED – CHEF GIVEN 3 DAYS TO PAY UP! was last modified: July 1st, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Conrad Gallagherlost casewages rowlast_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WEDNESDAY Emotional Freedom Technique for pain relief weekly demonstrations, 6:30-7:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends), Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org. THURSDAY Ask and It is Given classes, 6:30-8 p.m., Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at 1008 W. Ave. M-4, Palmdale. Call (661) 992-3229 or 944-1130. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 569 will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Grecian Isles Mobile Home Park, 4444 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-7672 or (661) 285-5003. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. FRIDAY Fun After 40 Ballroom Dance Club hosts ballroom dancing, 7:30-10 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12. Dance lessons are 6:30-7:30 p.m. Dance admission is $2 for club members, $4 for nonmembers. Dance lessons are $2. Call (661) 943-0210 or 267-5551. Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting Course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host an American potluck and white elephant gift game party, 7 p.m. in Palmdale. Bring a main dish, salad or dessert, a beverage, and an unwanted gift valued under $10. Call (661) 267-2586 or (661) 266-9126. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for brunch, 12:30 p.m. at Le Chene restaurant, 12625 Sierra Highway, Agua Dulce. Call (661) 267-2586 by Jan. 27. Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 non-members. Call (661) 949-9467 or 723-4891. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at the Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for its weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club will meet, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org.last_img read more

Trial to start in PR probe

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event District Attorney Steve Cooley and U.S. Attorney Debra W. Yang’s offices said the investigation into pay-to-play allegations is continuing, although only the Fleishman-Hillard executives have been charged. “Early in 2004, this office and the U.S. Attorney’s Office combined forces and resources in investigating public corruption of some Los Angeles City officials and operations,” Cooley said in a statement. “This unprecedented district attorney/U.S. attorney partnership in Los Angeles resulted in federal indictments naming the former chief of Fleishman-Hillard’s L.A. office, Douglas R. Dowie, and a senior vice president, John Stodder, in an alleged fraudulent billing scheme involving the DWP. … Other matters remain under investigation.” Added U.S. attorney spokesman Thom Mrozek: “It’s moving forward.” Dowie, 58, a former managing editor at the Los Angeles Daily News and ex-chief of staff to former state Assemblyman Richard Katz, has pleaded not guilty to the 16-count indictment returned June 2. Stodder, 50, pleaded not guilty to 11 wire fraud counts in an earlier indictment, as well as to one conspiracy charge. Sugarman, who also served as a former spokesman for Mayor Richard Riordan, pleaded guilty to three counts of wire fraud in connection with inflating DWP billing hours by tens of thousands of dollars. The trial before U.S. District Judge Gary Allen Feess is expected to last up to four weeks. Discovery already has included more than 1 million e-mails and other documents, including billing records and work sheets. But questions remain about where the investigation of pay-to-play is going, if anywhere. Laurie Levenson, a Loyola Law School professor and former federal prosecutor, said it’s unusual for a major investigation to gain momentum after two years have passed. “It looks like it’s dying a slow death,” Levenson said. “You can’t be sure. But unless you’re lucky, things don’t (usually) get hotter down the road.” Levenson said the Dowie-Stodder trial could be a last-ditch effort to obtain additional information, noting the eve of trial conventionally is the time of “maximum pressure.” “If it doesn’t happen soon, it’s hard to believe it will happen,” she added. “It’s an awfully long bluff.” Dowie once played a prominent civic role and was in regular contact with Hahn’s inner circle, in particular Troy Edwards, the former young and inexperienced deputy mayor overseeing the three proprietary departments – Harbor, Airports and Water and Power, according to e-mails. Edwards, who resigned March 25, 2004, after testifying before a county grand jury, could not be reached for comment. At the peak of his career, Dowie was valued by Hahn and other local political figures for his skill. He was making a base salary of $330,000, along with stock grants, a car allowance and bonuses, according to documents filed in a wrongful termination suit he filed against the company after being fired Jan. 5, 2005. The opposition to a motion for summary judgment in that civil case notes that Dowie was honored in February 2004 with the American Jewish Committee’s Civic Leadership Award at a banquet attended by Hahn and other political leaders, as well as the firm’s senior executives. The event was co-chaired by Fleishman-Hillard Chairman John Graham and former President Bill Clinton’s Chief of Staff Leon Panetta, along with then-Gov. Gray Davis and former Commerce Secretary and U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor. Dowie had cultivated close ties to a number of local politicians, including City Controller Laura Chick, who began questioning the DWP contract with Fleishman-Hillard in summer 2002. Chick was central to bringing pay-to-play allegations to Cooley’s attention, but now says she has doubts that the investigations will pan out. “I’ve been told these are the hardest cases to prove, and almost (can’t be) unless people are wired, and there are real offers of money or favors. And I don’t think it got to that level.” Chick said that while she hoped nobody had “crossed the line,” she felt there were sufficient questions and “things that needed further exposure” to indicate “tough indictments” might be forthcoming. “I knew things didn’t smell right. There were some ways of awarding contracts that were skirting the lines. I wanted the funny business to be cleared up and to go away,” she said. “The good news has been, it had a chilling effect and changed the style of behavior.” Bill Boyarsky, a city ethics commissioner and former journalist, said City Hall has been quiet regarding the pay-to-play investigations, adding that, in general, investigations ought to be concluded “ASAP” in fairness to those affected. And while the specter of pay-to-play investigations undoubtedly has made people “more watchful” and less inclined to hide their political financial dealings, the accused also have rights, Boyarsky said. James Acevedo, a former Harbor Commission member and Valley power broker, said he hasn’t heard anything about pay-to-play in months. “I think it was good politics, that’s all.” Bill Carrick, Hahn’s campaign media consultant and strategist, said he hasn’t heard anything. “I would have heard in the echo chambers,” said Carrick. “I think it was always about this contract at Fleishman-Hillard.” Carrick said he believes the pay-to-play investigations were the “catalyst” for Antonio Villaraigosa to challenge Hahn – who vehemently denied any wrongdoing and said any criminal action should be punished – because of his perception that the mayor had been made vulnerable. He said the lives of several people swept up in the investigation have been “made miserable” by unproven allegations. Some of those individuals include Edwards, Ted Stein, former head of the Airports Commission, and former DWP Commissioner Leland Wong. “It’s a very unfair system.” Beth Barrett, (818) 713-3731 beth.barrett@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! With City Hall still under the investigative spotlight, the only people charged with felonies in the lengthy probe of political corruption in Los Angeles are set to go on trial this week, accused of overbilling the Department of Water and Power for public relations services. Trial begins Tuesday for former Fleishman-Hillard executives Doug Dowie and John Stodder on federal conspiracy and wire fraud charges alleging they bilked the DWP out of more than $300,000. A third executive, Steve Sugarman, has pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against the other two. The charges grew out of a sweeping federal-state investigation into accusations that then-Mayor James Hahn’s administration engaged in “pay-to-play” practices to squeeze political money from city contractors. Dowie, who headed the public relations firm’s Los Angeles office, arranged significant contributions to campaigns for Hahn and other city officials and got a $3 million-a-year DWP contract while providing free P.R. advice to the mayor and others. last_img read more

DDTV – REMEMBERING THE DAY A BOMBER LANDED ON A DUNFANAGHY BEACH

first_imgDDTV – REMEMBERING THE DAY A BOMBER LANDED ON A DUNFANAGHY BEACH was last modified: June 16th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:bombercommemorationdonegalDunfanaghyKillyhoey Beachlast_img read more

SC Villa joins KCCA in Uganda Cup semis

first_imgComments Stanbic Uganda Cup 2017/18 Quarter FinalsKJT 0-3 SC VillaStarTimes Stadium, LugogoSunday, 22-04-2018SC Villa become the second side to reach the semi finals of the 2017/18 Uganda Cup after they defeated fourth division side KJT 3-0 at the StarTimes Stadium in Lugogo.Like KCCA FC a day before, SC VIlla made it easy for them selves as they raced into an early lead after 10 minutes through a George Ssenkaba header.Star player Martin Kizza made it 2-0 from the penalty spot before another penalty with 21 minutes to play from Ambrose Kirya ensecured Villa’s passage to a second semi final appearance in four years.SC Villa’s Matin kiiza unleashes a shot against KJT on Sunday at the Lugogo.“Am delighted that we have reached the semi finals, said SC Villa head coach Wasswa Bbosa.“We approached the game in a way that we put it in our minds that we are playing a top tier side especially after the things they(KJT) have done to URA ans Bul earlier in the competition.“They made it easy for us because they are a side that loves to play as they pass the ball around which played into our favor as we can also do likewise.“In the semi finals, we expect stronger opposition so we need to work on our striking department so as we sharpen it further.SC Villa IX that started the game against KJTThe two other quarter finals will be played next weekend.Synergy hosts Proline at the Masaka Recreational Stadium on Saturday and Kansai Plascon will face Vipers at Naro Ntawo playground the following day.The winner of this championship will pocket Shs. 30M with the runners up assured of Shs. 20M.The losing semi finalists will each bag Shs. 10M and quarter finalists 5M each.KCCA is the reigning champion after defeating West Nile side Paidha Black Angels 2-0 away at the Bet Way Green Light Stadium in Arua.This year’s final will be hosted by the North East region in Kumi Municipality (exact playing field will be confirmed).Other Uganda Cup quarter final matches:Saturday, April 28th 2018Synergy vs. Proline FC, Masaka Recreational StadiumSunday, April 29th 2018Kansai Plascon vs. Vipers SC – Naro Ntawo playground Tags: ambrose kiiryageorge ssenkabaKCCA FCkjtmartin kiizaprolineSC Villavipers sclast_img read more

The Paddy Kenny quiz

first_imgIf Paddy Kenny leaves QPR this summer he will do so after two very eventful seasons at Loftus Road. Test your knowledge of the R’s keeper by seeing how many of these five questions you can answer correctly.[wp-simple-survey-50]Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Pin the Feather on the Dinosaur

first_imgOnce again, careless artists and reporters have put imaginary feathers on a three-ton dinosaur that couldn’t fly.Baby Louie is not a new fossil; it was discovered 25 years ago in China. “Although the fossil of the infant dinosaur is small, it would have grown into an adult weighing more than 1,000kg,” reports Helen Briggs for the BBC News. What is it? It’s a hatchling of an oviraptorasaur, a type of dinosaur well known from eggs but rarely found as an adult. Specifically, this one they call a “caenagnathid oviraptorosaur.” It is named Beibeilong sinensis, or “baby dragon from China.”Briggs goes out of her way to make sure readers know this big creature was very much like a bird. The artist reconstruction, prominent at the top of the article, shows the hatchling’s body covered in downy feathers. Its doting mother has striped feathers, with special feathers lining its arms as if trying to evolve flight. Briggs says,The fossil of a baby dinosaur discovered in China more than 25 years ago has formally been identified as a new species of feathered dinosaur….They say it is the first known specimen of a gigantic bird-like dinosaur belonging to the group known as oviraptorosaurs….”It stretches the mind to imagine these wee little embryos growing into a one-ton feather-covered dinosaur that would have looked quite a bit like Big Bird,” he [Stephen Brusatte] said.”And they were weird – with feathers and beaks, but no teeth.”Surely the paper in Nature Communications will illuminate us about these feathers. Let’s look. Veteran dinosaur expert Philip J. Currie is a co-author. He ought to know.Search on feathers: zero mentions.Search on integument: zero.Search on quill knobs: zero.Search on bird: zero (except in the references).Search on ostrich, emu, cassowary: zeroSearch on wing, flight, or flying: nothing.Search on evolution: none, except in the references, and a phylogenetic chart.If this creature had feathers, the paper says nothing about them. It would seem an important trait to mention, if they were present.A look at photos of the fossil seems to show only bones. The only place where possible feathers can be seen is in an artist’s drawing of the embryo in its egg. It appears to be covered in some kind of downy material (not shown on the actual bones). Some have suggested that things that resemble fuzz might be decayed collagen, or integumentary structures that had only stems, like hair: no branches like those on true feathers. “All bones of the skeleton show fibrous juvenile bone texturing,” the paper says, but nothing like fuzz or hair is apparent on the bones. “Most of the forelimbs, feet and tail are missing or not visible.” Yet those are prominently feathered in the BBC’s artwork.Live Science doesn’t mention feathers on this fossil, but twice makes it seem like a bird. New Scientist says, “Flightless Beibeilong sinensis, which lived around 90 million years ago, had feathers, primitive wings and a beak, but dwarfed any of its modern bird relatives.” Both articles reproduce the artwork, imaginary feathers and all.Another creature from China is clearly a bird, but National Geographic calls it a dinosaur. Jianianhualong had asymmetrical flight feathers like Archaeopteryx, which clearly had aerodynamic capabilities. It looked like a bird, it walked like a bird, and it flew like a bird. So why are evolutionists calling it a dinosaur? This fossil shows that flight evolved earlier than evolutionists had believed, forcing them to push featherhood into the more distant past:But finding asymmetrical feathers in a species that holds Jianianhualong’s unique place in the phylogenetic tree suggests that such feathers might be present in the common ancestor of both birds and troodontids—placing this link further back in the tree than previously thought, to about 160 million years ago.Live Science repeatedly calls this fossil a dinosaur, and makes the preposterous claim that aerodynamic feathers evolved in dinosaur ancestors before they could fly. That’s right; the paper in Nature Communications begins, “Asymmetrical feathers have been associated with flight capability but are also found in species that do not fly, and their appearance was a major event in feather evolution.” Phil Currie was a co-author on this paper, too.This type of shoddy science reporting is comparable to Haeckel’s embryos. When they don’t have evidence, they just draw it or paint it on. If this oviraptorosaur had feathers, show the feathers! Where are they? They’re imaginary. So is the reporters’ credibility. If Jianianhualong had wings and flight feathers, why are they calling it a dinosaur?Henry Gee said in Nature in 1999, “The attribution of ancestry does not come from the fossil; it can only come from us. Fossils are mute; their silence gives us unlimited license to tell their stories for them, which usually take the form of ancestry and descent…. Everything we think we know about the causal relations of events in Deep Time has been invented by us, after the fact.” (cited by Tom Bethell in Darwin’s House of Cards, p. 29). With that in mind, analyze this paper in Nature (April 27, 2017) about some supposed common ancestral tree of birds and dinosaurs, and look at all the Darwin Flubber they cook up in their storytelling lab.In his new book Zombie Science, Jonathan Wells says this about the dinosaur-to-bird evolution story:“Dino-bird advocates base their view on cladistic analyses of various skeletal features shared by dinosaurs and modern birds. But as we have seen there are no ancestors in a cladogram, so the idea that birds evolved from dinosaurs is only a hypothesis. Nevertheless, the dino-bird party has declared itself to be The Scientific Consensus. As far as they are concerned, the debate is over, and Science Says birds are dinosaurs” (p. 62)….“Meanwhile, both sides in the dino-bird controversy must invent ghost lineages to connect the fossils with each other. Neither has found the ancestor of modern birds. But one thing is sure: Archaeopteryx is not it” (p. 63).If evolutionists insist on playing pin the feather on the dinosaur, we’re going to pin the blame for fake science on them when this dino-bird story collapses. (Visited 705 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more