Abbe Sweeney joins VABVI as new development assistant

first_imgSteve Pouliot, Executive Director for the Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (VABVI), is pleased to announce that Abbe Sweeney recently joined the staff as the development assistant. This position is based in the Burlington office.A native Vermonter and Colchester High School graduate, Abbe currently resides in Burlington. She has an Associates Degree in PC Networking fromChamplain College and is working towards a Bachelors Degree in business. Her responsibilities in her new position include recording daily gifts, mailing donor acknowledgments, assisting with direct mail campaigns and other development projects. In her free time, Abbe enjoys travel, reading, yoga and cooking.VABVI was founded in 1926 with the assistance of Helen Keller and the American Foundation for the Blind. The organization is the only private,non-profit organization in the state providing comprehensive training and support services for visually impaired Vermonters of all ages. They also provide information about adaptive equipment that can help after vision loss. VABVI offices are located in Brattleboro, Burlington, Montpelier, and Rutland. Call 1-800-639-5861 or write VABVI@aol.com(link sends e-mail) for more information. Our website is located at www.vabvi.org(link is external)\main.last_img read more

Northern Benefits, Ltd. announces a professional partnership with HR Resolution, LLC.

first_imgMore information about the services offered through thispartnership isavailable at www.hrresolution.com(link is external). “This is an important partnership for companies intoday’s businessenvironment,” said Paul Toth, president of HRResolution. “Our clients canexpect a more comprehensive package of services designed tohelp themattract high quality employees and inspire exceptionalperformance.”Services such as HRR’s Virtual HR Office, providing ongoing,knowledgeablehuman resources support to organizations that do not have afull timeprofessional, compliment the extensive employee benefit planscreated byNBL. Small to medium sized organizations will now haveaccess toprofessional level support aimed specifically at theirpersonnelchallenges, from creating affordable and effective employeebenefitspackages to complying with today’s complex employment laws. This unique partnership will provide businesses throughoutVermont and NewEngland a comprehensive range of human resources solutionsto ensure theyremain competitive in today’s economy. Jon Guyette,spokesperson fromNorthern explains, “Northern Benefits is responding tothe increased needof organizations to function with less staff and morecompliance issues.Our client obligation demands that we include this valuableservice.”center_img Northern Benefits, Ltd John Boutin John Boutin 1 0 2002-09-26T15:45:00Z 2002-09-26T15:45:00Z 1 288 1647 13 3 2022 9.3821 0 0Northern Benefits, Ltd. announces a professional partnershipwith HRResolution, LLC. Northern Benefits offers a unique service:analyzing &creating benefit plans for small to mid-size companies inNew England.Their services often reduce the overall cost of providingbenefits whilemaintaining employee satisfaction. HR Resolution is a leaderin providingorganizations with professional human resources andmanagement support.Organizations of all sizes have found HRR to be an importantresource foreffectively managing their most valuable asset; their staff.last_img read more

Imminent Choices in Health Care Explored at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont

first_imgImminent Choices in Health Care Explored atBlue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont Issues ConferenceCreative innovation as an opportunity to change and improve established health care systems, how the next 25 years will redefine the health care landscape, and what individuals can do to improve their health and well being were among a variety of topics addressed recently by a panel of national experts who met in Burlington.The experts highlighted a half-day conference held as part of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont’s annual health issues symposium series. Nearly 300 Vermonters attended, including employers, health care providers, legislators and consumers.Andrew Zolli, a Futurist-in-residence at Popular Science magazine, American Demographics magazine, National Geographic, and National Public Radios Marketplace, explored the trends and dynamics that will shape health care’s future over the next several decades. He offered options to help respond intelligently to emerging complex changes that matter most.Other panelists included John W. Kenagy, MD, of Kenagy and Associates, and Jane Brody, well-known author and widely-read columnist, and media personality.Dr. Kenagy focused on the role of creative innovation and changing systems from the bottom up.Jane Brody outlined the role that individuals play in maintaining their personal health through nutrition, exercise, and moderation.The half-day conference concluded with a documentary of the Voices project, an initiative sponsored by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont to draw attention to the issues and challenges facing Vermont teenagers, with the goal of helping to foster their physical and emotional wellbeing.The program was moderated by WCAX-TV Channel 3 news co-anchor and health care reporter, Kristin Kelly. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont President and CEO William R. Milnes, Jr. welcomed the conference participants and introduced the program.Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is the state’s oldest and largest private health insurer, providing coverage for about 180,000 Vermonters. It employs over 350 Vermonters at its headquarters in Berlin and branch office in Williston, and offers group and individual health plans to Vermonters. More information about Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is available on the Internet at www.bcbsvt.com(link is external). Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is an independent corporation operating under a license with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.(End)last_img read more

Camels Hump Middle School to serve as test site for solar program

first_imgGreen Mountain Power Corp,Camels Hump Middle School is well on its way to hosting a $500,000 solar installation that could serve as a statewide model for power generation and renewable energy education. Thanks in large part to federal funding secured by Senator Sanders and grants from the state’s Clean Energy Development Fund and Green Mountain Power, the Chittenden East school district will convert the roof of the 37 year-old school into a 72kW solar array.”In 1992, we were one of the first schools in Vermont to convert to biomass heating,” said Chittenden East superintendent Jim Massingham. “We are looking forward to taking this next step in showing the way to greater efficiency and hope that our project will help make it easier for other schools to make the best use of their resources. Having a system like this operational on our campus will also provide an invaluable educational resource for our students.”Like many of the schools built in the 1960’s and 70’s, Camels Hump features a large, flat roof, and was originally heated using electricity, which required a particularly good connection to the power grid. This combination provides the perfect environment for a large-scale solar installation. The school’s location in full view of Interstate 89 makes it an excellent demonstration site as well.”Their proposal fit perfectly with our Solar On Schools plan and Green Mountain Power’s ongoing effort to help build out solar capacity in Vermont,” said Mary Powell, Green Mountain Power president and chief executive officer. “By working with schools, we can help to provide a direct community benefit through cost savings while also cutting carbon output and bringing us closer to our goal of installing 10,000 panels in 1,000 days.”David O’Brien, Commissioner of the Department of Public Service, said this project fits in with Vermont values: “We know from our public engagement process that Vermonters want to see more in-state renewable energy projects. We’re pleased to see the state and federal government, private industry and public schools all come together to build renewable energy in our communities.”The project received $260,442 in federal funds secured by Senator Sanders, $250,000 from Vermont’s Clean Energy Development Fund and $25,000 in funding and technical support from Green Mountain Power, making the project cost effective for the local community. “This project will not only help the Camels Hump Middle School reduce its electric bill and carbon footprint, but will be a major step forward in moving our state toward a greener economy which relies more and more on sustainable energy,” Senator Sanders said. “There is little doubt in my mind that in the years to come the energy mix in this state will be very different than it is today — with a far greater reliance on sustainable energy. I hope that this project becomes a model for what can be done and a catalyst for further action.”The 345 panels will generate about 82,551 kWh each year or 12% of the schools’ annual electric usage. Over the 25-year life of the system, almost two million pounds of carbon dioxide will be offset. The school is also investigating simultaneous replacement of the building’s original power transformers that are nearing the end of their operational life.”We hope that the success of this project will lead to similar improvements at the other schools in our service territory and throughout the state,” said Ms. Powell.About Green Mountain PowerGreen Mountain Power (www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external)) transmits, distributes and sells electricity and utility construction services in the State of Vermont in a service territory with approximately one quarter of Vermont’s population. It serves more than 200,000 people and businesses. Source: GMP. COLCHESTER, VT–(Marketwire – April 16, 2009) –last_img read more

Ben & Jerry’s to go completely ‘Fair Trade’ by 2013

first_imgBen & Jerry’s Homemade, Inc,Ben & Jerry s announces its commitment to go fully Fair Trade across its entire global flavor portfolio. From Americone Dream to Chocolate Fudge Brownie, all of the flavors in all of the countries where Ben & Jerry s is sold will be converted to Fair Trade Certified ingredients by the end of 2013.Ben & Jerry s was the first ice cream company in the world to use Fair Trade Certified ¢ ingredients starting in 2005, and today it s racing ahead as the first ice cream company to make such a significant commitment to Fair Trade across its global portfolio.Company co-founder Jerry Greenfield said, Fair Trade is about making sure people get their fair share of the pie. The whole concept of Fair Trade goes to the heart of our values and sense of right and wrong. Nobody wants to buy something that was made by exploiting somebody else.Ben & Jerry s Fair Trade commitment means that every ingredient that can be sourced Fair Trade Certified, now or in the future, is Fair Trade Certified. Globally, this involves converting up to 121 different chunks and swirls, working across eleven different ingredients such as cocoa, banana, vanilla and other flavorings, fruits, and nuts. It also means working with Fair Trade cooperatives that total a combined membership of over 27,000 farmers.Rob Cameron, Chief Executive of Fairtrade Labelling Organizations International (FLO) said, Congratulations to Ben & Jerry s on the scale and the depth of this commitment to take their whole range Fair Trade. Tackling poverty and sustainable agriculture through trade may not be easy but it is always worth it, and Ben & Jerry s has demonstrated real leadership in laying out this long-term ambition to engage with smallholders, who grow nuts, bananas, vanilla, cocoa and other Fair Trade-certified ingredients. Ben & Jerry s, like all of us in the Fair Trade movement, believe that people can have fun standing up to injustice and campaigning against poverty while enjoying some of Ben & Jerry s best-selling favorites like Phish Food and Chocolate Fudge Brownie, how cool is that.Paul Rice, President and CEO of TransFair USA, says, Ben & Jerry s has been a model for socially responsible business for 32 years, proving that being responsible and sustainable are good for business. Their entry into Fair Trade in 2005 builds on that history and has had a real impact on the lives of family farmers around the world. By converting their ingredients to Fair Trade, Ben & Jerry s will help galvanize its suppliers to join the Fair Trade movement. That represents a huge leap forward for Fair Trade in the United States, and it s once again the kind of bold, pioneering move for which the company is known and admired.Farmers selling Fair Trade products earn a better income, which allows them to stay on their land. Fair Trade premiums also allow for reinvestment in their farms, their families, their communities and their future. Fair Trade means that certified farmers are using environmentally sound practices to grow and harvest their crops in a sustainable way.About Ben & Jerry sBen & Jerry s produces a wide variety of super-premium ice cream and ice cream novelties, using high-quality ingredients including milk and cream from family farmers who do not treat their cows with the synthetic hormone rBGH. The company states its position on rBGH on its labels. Ben and Jerry s products are distributed nationwide and in selected foreign countries in supermarkets, grocery stores, convenience stores, franchise Ben & Jerry s Scoop Shops, restaurants and other venues. Ben & Jerry s, a Vermont corporation and wholly-owned subsidiary of Unilever, operates its business on a three-part Mission Statement emphasizing product quality, economic reward and a commitment to the community. The goal of the social mission is to integrate a concern for the community into as many day to day business operations as possible while maintaining the product and economic missions. The move to Fair Trade ingredients is driven by that commitment. For more visit www.benjerry.com(link is external).Source: BURLINGTON, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Ben & Jerry s. 2.18.2010.last_img read more

SBA proposes change in size standards for real estate, education industries

first_imgProposed rules published today for comment in The Federal Register by the US Small Business Administration would adjust the size definition of small businesses in 29 industries in one sub-industry in two broad categories of businesses, ranging from real estate and property management to colleges, junior colleges and universities. The proposed adjustments to size standards in 20 industries and one sub-industry in Sector 53 of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), ‘Real Estate and Rental and Leasing,’ and in nine industries in Sector 61, ‘Educational Services,’ reflect changes in marketplace conditions in those sectors.   In both sectors, the proposed changes are based on annual gross revenues.  The standards delineate how large a business can be and still qualify as small for federal government programs. The dollar limits refer to annual revenues averaged over three years.  As part of the ongoing comprehensive review of all size standards as required under the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010, the SBA is evaluating all industries in these sectors that have revenue-based size standards to determine whether the existing size standards should be adjusted.  The last overall review of size standards occurred more than 25 years ago.The proposed changes take into account the structural characteristics within individual industries, including average firm size, degree of competition, and federal government contracting trends.  This ensures that size definitions reflect current economic conditions within those industries.  An SBA White Paper entitled ‘Size Standards Methodology’ (Oct. 21, 2009) explains how SBA establishes, reviews and modifies its receipts-based and employee-based small business size standards.  It is available for viewing at http://www.sba.gov/size(link is external). The upward revisions would allow some small businesses that are close to exceeding their current size standards to retain small business eligibility under the proposed higher size standards, and give federal agencies a larger selection of small businesses to choose from for small business procurement opportunities.  They also would allow more small businesses to qualify for SBA financial assistance.  SBA estimates that up to 13,000 more firms in Sector 53 and 1,500 more companies in Sector 61 will qualify for SBA assistance and other federal programs if the proposed revisions are adopted. Interested parties can submit comments on these proposed rules on or before January 17, 2012.  The SBA recommends that comments be submitted online at www.regulations.gov(link is external) or mailed to Khem R. Sharma, Chief, Size Standards Division, 409 3rd St., SW, Mail Code 6530, Washington, D.C.  20416.  The SBA will post all comments to www.regulations.gov(link is external) for public review.  The SBA does not accept comments submitted by email. For more information about SBA’s revisions to its small business size standards, click on ‘What’s New with Size Standards’ on SBA’s website at http://www.sba.gov/size(link is external).The proposed rule would affect the following industries in NAICS Sector 53: NAICScodes   NAICS Industry titles   Current size standard ($ million)       Proposed size standard ($ million)     531110  Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings  $7.0    $25.5  531120  Lessors of Nonresidential Buildings (except Miniwarehouses)     $7.0    $25.5  531190  Lessors of Other Real Estate Property   $7.0    $25.5  Except, Leasing of Building Space to Federal Government by Owners       $20.5   $35.5  531210  Offices of Real Estate Agents and Brokers       $2.0    $7.0   531311  Residential Property Managers   $2.0    $7.0   531312  Nonresidential Property Managers        $2.0    $7.0   531320  Offices of Real Estate Appraisers       $2.0    $7.0   531390  Other Activities Related to Real Estate $2.0    $7.0   532111  Passenger Car Rental    $25.5   $35.5  532112  Passenger Car Leasing   $25.5   $35.5  532120  Truck, Utility Trailer, and RV (Recreational Vehicle) Rental and Leasing        $25.5   $35.5  532210  Consumer Electronics and Appliances Rental      $7.0    $35.5  532220  Formal Wear and Costume Rental  $7.0    $19.0  532230  Video Tape and Disc Rental      $7.0    $25.5  532291  Home Health Equipment and Rental        $7.0    $30.0  532411  Commercial, Air, Rail, and Water, Transportation Equipment and Rental   $7.0    $30.0  532412  Construction, Mining and Forestry Machinery and Equipment Rental and Leasing    $12.5   $30.0  532420  Office Machinery and Equipment Rental and Leasing       $25.5   $30.0  532490  Other Commercial, and Industrial Machinery and Equipment Rental and Leasing     $7.0    $30.0  533110  Lessors of Nonfinancial Intangible Assets (except Copyrighted Works)    $7.0    $35.5  The proposed rule would affect the following industries in NAICS Sector 61: NAICS code       NAICS industry title    Current size standard ($ million)       Proposed size standard ($ million)     611110  Elementary and Secondary Schools        $7.0    $10.0  611210  Junior Colleges        $7.0    $19.0  611310        Colleges, Universities and Professional Schools        $7.0    $25.5  611420        Computer Training        $7.0    $10.0  611430        Professional and Management Development Training        $7.0    $10.0  611519        Other Technical and Trade Schools        $7.0    $14.0  611630        Language Schools        $7.0    $10.0  611699        All Other Miscellaneous Schools and Instruction        $7.0    $10.0  611710        Educational Support Services        $7.0    $14.0last_img read more