SA’s Adcock Ingram in Indian acquisition

first_img22 January 2013 South African pharmaceutical company Adcock Ingram has completed the acquisition of Indian healthcare firm Cosme Farma Laboratories Limited for R745-million, the organisation announced last week. “We look forward to developing a solid business in India as part of our international revenue streams,” Adcock Ingram’s deputy chief executive and financial director, Andy Hall, said in a statement. The acquisition forms part of the firm’s growth strategy into new territories, particularly emerging economies. “[It] looks forward to pursuing organic growth opportunities and acquisitions in selected markets, developing exportable competencies,” the company said. From its beginnings 120 years ago as the EJ Adcock Pharmacy in Krugersdorp, west of Johannesburg, the company has grown to a market capitalisation of approximately R9-billion and occupying a 10% share of the private pharmaceutical industry in South Africa. It is also listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. “Adcock Ingram made the move to buy the Indian company in late 2012, and completed the transaction with all the conditions precedent being fulfilled,” the firm said. “Adcock Ingram will now assimilate over 1 000 former Cosme employees, and will look to build a growth base in the country.” Cosme Farma is a healthcare company based in Goa, and was started as a small retail pharmacy known as the Cosme Matias Menezes Group (CMM) in 1910. It has since become a conglomerate with international collaborations and strategic alliances with eight multinational companies and a global presence in 20 countries. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Sleepless in Kolkata: Kashmiris live in constant fear of threats

first_imgA Kashmiri college student helping a friend write an article gave up after repeatedly trying to get Kolkata’s Kashmiris to speak. They refused to talk, the student said.“Even my father refused to talk about the nature of fear that has gripped us over the last week,” the student said on condition of anonymity, adding, “Please do not disclose my gender. I do not want to be the reason of trouble for my family and for Kashmiris.” The few hundred Kashmiris in Kolkata have experienced unprecedented hostility over the last week.“An absurd number of hate messages have flooded Facebook. Kashmiri women are issued rape threats, men are threatened with lynching and attacks on their families,” the student said, showing screenshots of hate messages. One of the screenshots notes that a similar “number of [a slang] Kashmiris are available in Bengal,” indicating that the Pulwama terror attack could be avenged in Kolkata.In the past one week, a prominent doctor has been threatened, a shawl seller was brutally beaten in Nadia district, another was threatened in Lalbag in Murshidabad, while other cases are reported but could not be verified. In Lalbag, both the accused and the victim, the shawl seller, were arrested.Many are surprised that Kashmiris in the city are not speaking up. “The reason is because it is a tiny group,” said Sabir Ahamed, organiser of a community-based campaign to diffuse communal tension, Know Your Neighbour. “The other factor, however, is even more distressing. As soon as a news report is published, people equipped to create trouble are digging out names, locations and even house numbers of the threatened persons, analysing data and issuing more threats. So media reports that are casually disclosing identities are not helping in any way,” Mr. Ahamed said.The student said news of attacks on Kashmiri traders in the city and “the Muslim-Kashmiri identity” was also a reason. They never expected “such behavior” in Kolkata as many have been living in Kolkata for generations.A Kashmiri housewife said she is planning to leave the city for Hyderabad, “because the politics of Bengal has some form of bloodiness in it, at least before the elections.” She said, “Many of our friends and cousins are trying to move to southern States. We have heard that there are fewer or no threats to Kashmiris in south. Perhaps women are safer in Karnataka compared to Bengal.”However, one Kashmiri, a government servant in Srinagar on a visit to Kolkata, said that he is not too keen to return to his home State before the scheduled date of departure.last_img read more

They are leaving a ‘sinking ship’: Aparna Sen on Bengali actors joining BJP

first_imgA day after several Bengali actors joined the BJP, noted film-maker Aparna Sen on Friday said they were leaving a “sinking ship” and drifting towards power. The actors were with the CPI(M) when it was in power, rallied behind Trinamool Congress chief Mamata Banerjee when she took over the reins of the State and are switching over to the BJP when it is gaining ground, she told PTI in an interview. On Thursday, several Bengali actors, including Parno Mittra, Rishi Kaushik, Kanchana Moitra and Rupanjana Mitra, joined the BJP at its headquarters in the presence of the Party’s West Bengal unit head Dilip Ghosh and senior functionary Mukul Roy.“Now that Mamata is slowly losing ground and the BJP is gaining, they are going to the BJP. Where there is power, they will go. There are people like that. I don’t care about them, I don’t think about them,” Ms. Sen, who is in Delhi for the premiere of her film “Ghawre Baire Aaj”, said. “People leave the sinking ship and go where the power is. It’s a common human instinct,” she added. Over the years, the TMC has been fielding several Bengali superstars as candidates for elections. Superstar Dev won the Lok Sabha polls for the second term this year, while actors Nusrat Jahan and Mimi Chakraborty debuted in Parliament this time. Ms. Sen, who is known for being vocal on socio-political issues, said Hindi film stars have to think about the wider range of audience they cater to and that’s why they don’t publicise their political stands. “If they are seen to have any political colour, then they will have a problem,” the 73-year-old said. She said the BJP is “gaining ground” in West Bengal due to the failure of the Trinamool government and the lack of a viable alternative. “I don’t think they (people of Bengal) see any alternative actually at the moment because TMC government also has failed them and the Left, for all practical purposes, doesn’t exist anymore and Congress is also hardly there.” “But I think the Left and the Congress need to rise again. Because apart from anything else we need a strong Opposition,” she added. Ms. Sen was one of the many celebrities who campaigned against the Left government during the Nandigram and Singur movement, which helped the TMC come to power in 2011. In 2006-07, there were mass protests against the then Left State government over land acquisition for a Tata Nano factory in Singur and a chemical hub in Nandigram. The multi-lingual actor-director, who has made films such as “36 Chowringhee Lane” and “Mr. and Mrs. Iyer”, said in response to a question that she has always been a strong critic of Ms. Banerjee and had never supported her politically.“I didn’t support her cause. I was only against the massacre in Nandigram. I was not supporting Mamata’s cause. I was against uprooting of people in Singur when there was a land just opposite, where that could have been done [the Tata Nano factory]. “That was along with many other people, not just me. Nobody supported Mamata. Mamata happened to be the vote catcher and she took advantage of that situation. In fact, I have criticised Mamata many times publicly,” the National Award-winning director said. Asked if she has ever raised her concerns with Ms. Banerjee personally, Ms. Sen said she doesn’t have direct access to the Chief Minister. Ms. Sen recently met agitating junior doctors in Kolkata along with other civil society members and also visited the violence-hit Bhatpara area.Are her political activities were helping the BJP gain ground?“No, not at all. I talk to the people Bhatpara and we heard complaints both about BJP and about TMC. We heard a lot of complaints about Arjun Singh (the local BJP MP from Barrackpore). I have all those videos.” Ms. Sen was speaking on the sidelines of the Jagran Film Festival, where her political thriller “Ghawre Baire Aaj” premiered. The film based on Rabindranath Tagore’s novel ‘Ghare Baire’ portrays a love triangle in the backdrop of the current political situation in the country.last_img read more

Wrist splint

first_imgA wrist splint can relieve symptoms that can occur from overuse of the hand and wrist.Review Date:6/4/2011Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington, School of Medicine; C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Dept of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.last_img