Battling COVID-19, South Africa prepares for first vaccines

first_imgJOHANNESBURG (AP) — Battling a COVID-19 resurgence driven by a more infectious variant, South Africa is preparing to roll out its first vaccines to the country’s frontline healthcare workers. Health Minister Zweli Mkhize said a delivery of 1 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine is expected to arrive at Johannesburg’s international airport on Monday and there are plans for jabs to be given to doctors and nurses starting in mid-February. Mkhize said South Africa intends to vaccinate 67% of its 60 million people in 2021, starting with the most vulnerable health care workers.last_img read more

7 ways millennials are better with money than you are

first_imgThere’s a lot of eye rolling, patronizing, and dismissal of Millennials by older generations — some of which is warranted, some not. But have you ever thought about this cohort of tech-savvy professionals poised to take over the world and stopped to consider that they’re spending and saving much smarter than other generations? ‘Cause it’s true.What are they doing differently? Take a look at these seven ways Millennials are changing the money game entirely to forge their own path to financial success.1. Millennials Are Quick to Adopt New Payment TechnologiesThere used to be only three ways to pay for purchases — cash, check, or charge. But today there are several paperless options that require neither physical money nor the prospect of accumulating debt with credit. These new mobile-based payment technologies are linked directly to a bank account for what’s essentially a debit transaction without the card, and Millennials are adopting them in droves. continue reading » 49SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

3 things I learned while teaching my kids money smarts

first_imgThere is Very Little that We Truly NeedMy kids chide me about my old car — a 2002 Honda CRV. Following soccer practice, my daughter asked why I don’t get a new car (like that other soccer parent just did)? She proceeded to unwittingly undermine her case by removing her shoes and socks, revealing a fetid stench that reminded me of my days on the famed turnpike of my home state, New Jersey. I looked back at her, “You treat my car like a hamper and I certainly don’t need a new one of those.” Plus, the car still hasn’t hit 100k miles. It’ll probably run another fifteen years. I winked at her, saying, “Take care of this baby. She’ll be yours before you know it.”Fact is, I’m not a car guy. That’s probably because my dad wasn’t a car guy either. My first car was his old beater that my friends and I affectionately referred to as “the heap.” I thank my dad, though, for not passing on the “car guy” gene. I spend my time figuring how to not drive my car. You may have heard of Los Angeles traffic? It’s all true! Any day out of a car is a better day for me.It was actually in teaching my kids one of the core money-smart skills — distinguishing between needs vs. wants — that I began to reflect on my feelings about cars. There is so much “want” involved once you get past the basics of four wheels and a steering wheel. And really, beyond the obvious things — clothes, food and shelter — there really isn’t much else any of us need. Sure, there are certain “conditional” needs, such as a car for a long commute. But, they’re conditional because they can be remedied. For example, by changing jobs to shorten the commute, the car issue can be resolved. We convince ourselves that certain items are needs when they are not. Another good example — fancy smart phones. The same daughter who made fun of my car actually had some sage advice for me when I broke my iPhone and innocently noted that I needed to replace it. She looked at me sternly and quipped, “Dad, you don’t NEED an iPhone.” Touché, young padawan. Seems as though my kids have helped me as much as I’ve helped them. The Rush of Excitement You Get from Spending is FleetingThe spigot of stuff opens quickly when you’re a parent. So much so that I even wrote a children’s picture book about it — Joe the Monkey and Friends Learn about Spending Smart — to try and teach kids to avoid stuff (Check out my CU Insight piece about reducing stuff). If you’re not careful, every nook and cranny of your house becomes filled with new items when you become a parent. You can tidy and donate as much as you want, but if you don’t address the heart of the problem — inflow — you’re destined to live a life of overwhelming plenty.tijjiWhen I moved to Los Angeles many years ago, I remember a new friend talking about the importance of having the “finer things.” A Movado watch. A $500 sportcoat. Corinthian leather car seats (seriously — remember when that was a thing?). I bought most of these things. Of course, you know I’m not a car guy, so I did avoid the last one. The purchasing “highs” were so fleeting. After about a week, the objects were part of my baseline existence. The thrill was gone. I certainly wasn’t any happier. In fact, I just started looking for my next hit. Talking to my kids and trying to gird them against the dangers of chasing the “retail rush” has increased my self-awareness and helped me dramatically reduce my own inventory of stuff. Thanks, kids! Goals are PowerfulSaving for a goal is a very important core money-smart skill your kids should learn. Teaching my kids to set and save for goals has helped them learn a powerful life skill. Doing so connects them with the growth mindset that Carol Dweck describes in her seminal book, Mindset. “Growth mindsetters” believe that achievement comes from effort. Our traits are not fixed. We can always improve.Seeing these lessons carry over to non-monetary realms was gratifying. My younger daughter had saved money for a few goals. Then, she turned her goal-setting mindset to her chosen sport — soccer. She set a goal for her team to win the State Cup. Her team made it to the semifinals. It was an incredible run. Do you think falling just short of the cup taught her that goal-setting was a failure? Far from it. Getting that far — many rounds further than the previous year — was a massive accomplishment. Setting the early goal was key. Soccer is a team sport, so she didn’t entirely control the outcome. But, she played at the top of her game and setting the goal drove her high level of achievement. Seeing her goal written on the wall helped me recommit to my own goal setting. At the beginning of the year, I set a goal to finish a first draft of a book about helping families learn to become money comfortable. Now I’m just a few weeks from releasing that book.Thanks again to my two wonderful daughters for teaching me as much as I hope I’ve taught them. 83SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Lanza John Lanza is the Chief Mammal of Snigglezoo Entertainment, and Creator of The Money Mammals. John created The Saving Money Is Fun Kids Club for credit unions nationwide and has … Web: www.themoneymammals.com Detailslast_img read more

Prosecutors will not charge Don Hill, Osa Masina with assault

first_imgFormer USC linebackers Osa Masina and Don Hill will not be criminally prosecuted in Los Angeles for sexual assault, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office said Tuesday.Masina and Hill were suspended from the football team in September after a woman claimed that they forced intercourse. The woman said she was in a state where she had no control over her body.Masina argued that the act was consensual and that Hill did not have sex with the victim. The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office stated in a release on Tuesday that there is “insufficient evidence” to prove that the victim was unable to legally consent. This is due to the delay between the incident and the report by the victim, meaning that there is no physical evidence or toxicology reports.Hill is cleared of charges, as there is no evidence of any subsequent instances of assault.Masina, on the other hand, will still stand trial in Salt Lake City for allegedly sexually assaulting the same 19-year-old woman in Utah two weeks after she said she was assaulted in Los Angeles.The alleged victim and Masina attended the same party in their mutual hometown of Salt Lake City in July.After consuming alcohol and illicit substances, the woman said she fell asleep in the basement of the house and awoke to Masina raping her. Masina will face first-degree rape and forced sodomy charges at the trial, which is scheduled for June 26.last_img read more