Super Rugby TV audience breaks record

first_imgARU Managing Director and CEO, John O’Neill AO, said the energy and excitement around the 2011 Super Rugby season had culminated in an historic record breaking Final for Queensland and Australian Rugby.“This is a wonderful result and congratulations to the Reds for what has been a phenomenal season,” Mr O’Neill said.“Their ability to play not only winning Rugby but with flair and panache – an entertaining style that has attracted people to our game around the country – is reflected in these record shattering numbers. It was a Red letter day for Queensland last night and continues today with these unprecedented subscription TV results.”The record ratings for the 2011 Super Rugby Final caps an unparalleled season of Super Rugby on FOX SPORTS, where regular season average audiences for Live matches were 41% higher than the previous season. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NEW SUBSCRIPTION TELEVISION RATINGS RECORD2011 SUPER RUGBY FINALQUEENSLAND REDS v CRUSADERSSATURDAY 9 JULY, 2011AVERAGE AUDIENCE: 518,000Previous record subscription television audience: 431,000 (Socceroos v Uzbekistan World Cup Qualifier, April 1, 2009).Previous Record Audience For Super Rugby Broadcast On FOX SPORTS: 333,000 (2008 FINAL – Crusaders v Waratahs). Try scorers – Digby Ioane and Will GeniaAustralian Rugby Union is today celebrating an historic and record breaking Super Rugby Final, that saw the subscription TV audience and Super Rugby crowd records smashed as the Queensland Reds claimed their maiden Super Rugby title.Last night’s gripping Super Rugby Final between the Reds and the Crusaders obliterated the subscription television ratings record with an average audience of 518,000 viewers tuning in to the Live and Exclusive broadcast on FOX SPORTS 3HD & FOX SPORTS 3.The dramatic encounter between two of the competition’s most entertaining teams delivered Australian subscription television its first average audience in excess of 500,000, surpassing the World Cup Qualifier match between the Socceroos and Uzbekistan, by around 20%, which was seen by an average audience of 431,000 in April 2009.The match also attracted some 185,000 more viewers than the previous most watched Super Rugby broadcast, which was the 2008 decider between the Crusaders and Waratahs.Subscription TV records weren’t the only ones being set last night with the highest ever crowd for a provincial Rugby game turning out at Suncorp Stadium.A record 52,113 came through the gates for last night’s final eclipsing the previous provincial Rugby crowd record of 49,327 set in 1907 between NSW and New Zealand at the SCG. BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – JULY 09: Will Genia and Digby Ioane of the Reds celebrate a try during the 2011 Super Rugby Grand Final match between the Reds and the Crusaders at Suncorp Stadium on July 9, 2011 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Chris Hyde/Getty Images)last_img read more

SuperBru Predictions: Aviva Premiership – Round three

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In the sting of things: Wasps provided last weekend’s big result – will you be backing them against Quins? Round Three: Just as some Aviva Premiership clubs are starting to build some momentum for the campaign ahead of them, so some of you prediction gurus are showing some clairvoyant clout. Here are our Superbru predictions for this weekend’s fixtures – see if you can do better.Gloucester vs Exeter ChiefsGloucester produced a stirring comeback to edge a thriller at home to Sale last weekend, and the Cherry and Whites will need to back that up with a win here if they are to rebuild a fortress at Kingsholm. Exeter are looking to respond after a 24-20 defeat to Leicester in Round Two, with the Chiefs squad bolstered by the return of England winger Jack Nowell to the matchday 23. The visitors proved strongest in this fixture last season, and don’t be too surprised to see them do the same again today. Exeter by 5Sale Sharks vs London WelshDanny Cipriani provided a fly-half masterclass last time out, playing a part in three tries for his side and adding a fourth himself. If he can produce a similar performance here, it would go a long way to helping Sale pick up their first win of the season. London Welsh secured a try bonus point in Round Two defeat at Bath, but the focus must turn to their defence this time out – another heavy loss could see them become only the second club in Premiership history to ship 50 points in three consecutive matches (bonus points for naming the other!). Expect the Sharks to get off the mark. Sale by 13Harlequins vs London WaspsThe Stoop faithful will be desperate to see an immediate turnaround after Quins were humbled 39-0 in a dreadful result last Friday. Their visitors come into the game in polar-opposite form, having bested champions Northampton 20-16 at Adams Park. James Haskell put in an outstanding performance in that match, and his back-row clash with the likes of Chris Robshaw and Nick Easter could be explosive. Last weekend’s thrashing could well be the catalyst for a big reaction from the hosts. Harlequins by 9 Newcastle Falcons vs Northampton SaintsNewcastle’s 17-match losing streak would have come to an end last weekend, had Juan Pablo Socino brought his kicking boots to Kingston Park. Instead, five missed kicks meant that run stretched to 18 games, and the visit of the Saints this weekend is hardly a game to provide much respite. Jim Mallinder’s men will want a response to the Wasps defeat last time out, and their sparkling backline will sense an opportunity here. Northampton by 19center_img Bath vs Leicester TigersThis game is being touted as the battle of the fly-halves, as two unbeaten sides face off at the Rec. Bath’s George Ford has kept himself firmly in Stuart Lancaster’s thoughts with his performances so far, whilst Freddie Burns was named man-of-the-match in a controlling display at Exeter last weekend. On top of that clash, this old-school fixture always provides a ferocious battle at the breakdown. This one is likely to be the closest match of the weekend. Bath by 4London Irish vs SaracensIrish face the unenviable task of providing a speedbump to the Saracens juggernaut, with all logic suggesting a win for the visitors as the only foreseeable outcome. Shane Geraghty has been kicking well for the Exiles, but the brutal efficiency, in attack and defence, that Sarries showed last Friday should prove too much. Saracens by 16 With the season in full swing, RW continue to put our (limited) knowledge to the test in the Premiership predictions challenge last_img read more

Six Nations: The root of France’s problems

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Are the French hindered by a lack of sport in their schools? Anglophone players are better equipped to deal with transition, and that’s why France are in danger of becoming a second-tier nation.The March 2015 issue of Rugby World is packed with Six Nations features. Find out how to download it here and for the latest subscription offers click here. For those who care about the state of French rugby, the most depressing result last weekend wasn’t the ugly performance at the Aviva Stadium on Saturday evening, where France lost 18-11 to Ireland, but the defeat 24 hours earlier at Dubarry Park in Athlone.On a raw winter’s evening Ireland U20 dished out a rugby lesson to their French counterparts in their 37-20 victory. True, the outstanding moment of the game was provided by a Frenchman, the brilliant solo try by Sekou Macalou, but in terms of technique, fitness and organisation, it was young men against little boys.The gulf in technical class was evident in the first few seconds when Ireland’s kick-off went to Macalou. Not only did the French flanker drop the ball but he was standing square on to the oncoming Irish as he did so. It was sloppy, and symptomatic of the malaise at the heart of the French game – man for man they are technically inferior to their Anglophone rivals.Stop sign: Thierry Dusautoir is brought to a halt during France’s 18-11 defeat by Ireland. Photo: InphoIt’s been a recurring complaint of France forwards coach Yannick Bru during his three years with the senior squad, and he said it again on Saturday night, complaining of the ‘technical rubbish’ served up by his players in Dublin.It’s the advent of professionalism that has exposed this weakness within French rugby. Up until the 1990s the French dazzled us with their – go on, I’ll say it – flair, their willingness to attack from anywhere, backs linking thrillingly with forwards, as they did so unforgettably in the ‘Try From the End of the World’ against the All Blacks in 1994. Here’s the video…A year later rugby went professional and in the last 20 years the game has undergone an extraordinary transformation. Players are fitter, teams better organised and coaches more astute. There is no longer the space on a field for the French to exploit. Rugby has become more technical and France have been found wanting. Why?It had been puzzling me for a while, and eventually the answer was provided when I visited Racing Metro last August. I asked their backs coach, Laurent Labit, if he agreed French players weren’t as good technically as their Anglophone opponents.He did agree, and his reason was illuminating: “There is a problem with sport in French schools and colleges,” he explained. “In Britain and the southern hemisphere children have opportunities to play all different sports, which is good for developing motor skills. In France you have to join a club outside school to play sports.”Voila! There is no organised team sport in the French school system, and while children learn how to swim that’s about it. My ten-year-old daughter, who goes to school in Paris, has one lesson of PE a week. Since the New Year it’s entailed throwing a frisbee to her mate.center_img In French schools the emphasis is overwhelmingly academic. Sporty kids must join a club outside school to indulge their passion getting the chance to practise sport on Wednesday afternoons (Wednesday is a half-day in French schools) and at weekends.Things improve slightly from 15 onwards when girls and boys with an obvious sporting talent can apply for a specialist sports school, such as an ‘Etude Rugby’, where lessons are combined with that particular sport. But there are only a limited number of places available so for many applicants disappointment is inevitable.Slow progress: Ireland U20 overcame their French counterparts on Friday night. Photo: InphoThe fact that there is no organised sports competitions in French schools means their young people are missing out on that wonderful experience of representing your school, of playing rugby alongside your mates, in front of your mates.Contrast that philosophy with the education system in much of the Commonwealth, where sport is central to the life of so many schools. The intensity of schoolboy rugby in Britain, playing in the NatWest Schools Cup, for example, matures the mind and develops the skills.Look at schools rugby in New Zealand and South Africa, where in the latter big games are televised and some matches draw crowds of 20,000. With that sort of motivation, teenagers are going to spend every waking hour improving their skills and honing their physique.The fact that the French are deprived of this opportunity leaves them at a huge disadvantage. The evidence? Look at the U20 World Championship, where in seven years the best France have managed is a fourth place in 2011.People often blame the Top 14 clubs for importing too many foreigners but perhaps they have to because too much young French talent isn’t up to scratch. There are many gifted youngsters in France – like 19-year-old Macalou – but often their athleticism is undermined by technical flaws, which are exposed they higher they climb up the representative ladder. Moving forwards? France go through their warm-up at the Aviva Stadium. Photo: Inpho last_img read more

Rugby World Cup 2023 Qualification Process

first_imgHow teams can book their place at the global showpiece in France Rugby World Cup 2023 Qualification ProcessThe qualification process for the 2023 Rugby World Cup in France has been confirmed.Twelve teams – South Africa, England, New Zealand, Wales, Japan, France, Australia, Ireland, Scotland, Italy, Argentina and Fiji – have already qualified for the tournament having finished in the top three of their pools at RWC 2019.The remaining eight places will be determined by a series of qualifying tournaments in 2021 and 2022, including a four-team, round-robin event to decide the final qualifier. The Americas and Europe both have two guaranteed qualifiers. The top two teams in the Rugby Europe Championship in March 2022 will go through to RWC 2023 as Europe 1 and Europe 2 while the format of the Americas tournament has yet to be confirmed.The winner of the 2022 Rugby Africa Cup will also be a direct qualifier (Africa 1), as will the winner of a home-and-away play-off between Samoa and Tonga in 2021 (Oceania 1).The loser of that play-off will go on to play the winner of next year’s Asia Rugby Championship home and away to determine the Asia/Pacific 1 qualifier.The Final Qualification Tournament will then take place in November 2022 featuring the loser of the Asia/Pacific 1 play-off, the runner-up in the Rugby Africa Cup, the third-placed team in the Rugby Europe Championship and the third best Americas team. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Popular: Somoa’s TJ Ioane takes a selfie with fans at RWC 2019 (Getty Images)World Rugby Chairman Bill Beaumont said: “With the global pandemic having halted most rugby activity, confirmation of the global qualification process for Rugby World Cup 2023 provides a beacon of excitement for all, including players and fans.“The process that has been developed via full consultation with our regional associations and member unions will provide a genuine opportunity for full member unions to qualify for our showcase men’s 15s event.“Maximising existing regional competitions, the process is good for regions and unions in managing costs for organisers and participants alike, which is important as we all recover from the global pandemic.”Shock result: Uruguay players celebrate beating Fiji at RWC 2019 (Getty Images)Tournament organisers will be hoping for a World Cup even more competitive than the 2019 edition, which saw Japan reach the quarter-finals for the first time and Uruguay stun Fiji.RWC 2023 chief executive Claude Atcher said: “This qualification process gives emerging unions an opportunity to take part in our sport’s biggest competition.“The success of Rugby World Cup 2019 in Japan and performances by the host nation is a testimony of rugby’s expansion globally.“As the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic is about to be won, I welcome this optimistic prospect of reconnecting with the excitement of our sport. This is the start of our journey towards France 2023, which will be the best tournament ever delivered.”The pool draw for the next World Cup is due to take place later this year, although with the coronavirus causing uncertainty over whether any more international fixtures will be played in 2020 that may be delayed. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Pittsburgh clergy can exercise ‘local option’ on same-sex blessings

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh] Bishop Dorsey McConnell has granted permission for clergy in the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh to bless same-sex relationships. In a Nov. 25 pastoral letter, McConnell announced that the decision of whether or not to bless same-sex relationships may be made by each pastor, in his or her own parish. The pastoral letter is accompanied by McConnell’s assessment of the provisional rite for blessing same-sex relationships, as authorized for trial use by the Episcopal Church’s General Convention in 2012, along with guidelines and other resources.November 25, 2013Dear Friends in Christ,As you know, the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church, meeting in Indianapolis in 2012, authorized at the discretion of the bishop, a provisional rite for blessing a lifelong covenant between persons of the same sex.  Prior to that, I had announced my intention to conduct a series of conversations in the diocese to give me a sense of the faithful and to lay the groundwork for our continuing unity.  These conversations have occurred, and I include a report as part of this letter.  Beyond that process, I have listened to many other voices, reflected deeply on Scripture, consulted broadly, and prayed throughout, asking that God would guide me toward a decision consistent with His will.  The purpose of this letter is to convey not only that decision, but also my hope in our future together and the scope of some of the pastoral considerations I believe we will need to keep in mind going forward.As I have listened to you, I have heard many passionate, and sometimes contradictory, hopes and fears.  Some have insisted they will not tolerate any permitted use of a blessing liturgy in this diocese, while others have insisted they will accept nothing less than sacramental marriage for same-sex couples.  Between these poles I have heard a host of nuanced positions, usually accompanied by the sincere desire for the unity of the Church and a deep hope that, whatever my decision, we would find a way to hold onto one another in Christ, setting an example for the world by our love.This unity in diversity has been in the forefront of expressed values since the earliest days of the rebuilding that took place in this diocese after 2008.  Our “Mission, Vision & Values” covenant from that time speaks of our commitment to each other, despite differences and disagreement, being united in greater measure by our faith expressed in the Creeds; by the authority of Scripture, tradition and reason in our common life; and by a commitment both to the order of the Episcopal Church and the fellowship of the Anglican Communion.  While that covenant does not explicitly name the issues concerning human sexuality, it has been understood that these matters are part of the diversity in the diocese, expressed in the character of local communities of faith, some congregations in the aggregate being more conservative on issues of sexuality, others more progressive, and a few quite mixed.Since this local character exists in variety of conviction, I find it reasonable that this variety should be allowed to express itself in local practice, by allowing the decision of whether or not to use this rite to be made by each pastor, in his or her own parish.  This “local option” will allow each rector or priest-in-charge to minister pastorally according to his or her commitments and conscience, while putting none under constraint or duress.Having said this, I must also be clear, both as your bishop and from my own place in this spectrum of belief, that I have serious reservations concerning the theology and intention of the rite, for reasons I have specified in an assessment that appears below.  I know that at least a few of the clergy inclined to use this rite share some of my concerns about it; I also know they see it as a way of offering public recognition and pastoral support to same-sex couples in whom qualities of mutual devotion and fidelity, care and nurture, and faithful participation in the life of the Church are clearly visible.  It is out of respect for their local pastoral authority, as well as out of my own pastoral regard for the free conscience of all who are under their care, that I will allow the use of this rite according to the guidelines that also appear below.As for the somewhat related matter of ordained ministry, I believe the principal determining factor in regard to my role as ordinary rests in my discernment, in concert with the Church, as to whether God is calling any given individual to Holy Orders.  Therefore, I will not alter the non-discrimination policy begun under Bishop Price; an individual’s being in a committed same-sex partnership will not, in and of itself, be a barrier either to ordination or call in this diocese.I have previously acknowledged that these policy decisions, along with the accompanying materials, will not satisfy everyone.  However, I believe we are called into one Body, as Christ’s members, and in and through that Body are called to bear with one another, not out of obligation, but out of joy in the gift God has given us through one another, perhaps especially in the gift of those who differ with us and yet whom we embrace as sisters and brothers in Christ.  In an increasingly polarized and contentious world, let us pray that our forbearance with one another in love will show forth the character of Jesus the Reconciler, whose heart of peace yearns over all our wars.Finally, I know that even to open this topic exposes the most tender areas of human identity and affections, the deepest questions of our aspirations and purpose in life, our acceptability before God and others, our call to holiness, and our need for grace.  Mindful that we all must one day render an account before the judgment seat of Christ, especially for those who were kept from the mercy of God by anything we have done or said, I ask your particular prayers and consideration, in the coming days, for the following:Those gay, lesbian, or transgendered people who have not found a welcome in the Church; as well as those who rejoice that their committed relationships may now be celebrated.Those of homosexual or heterosexual orientation who are committed to lives of holy celibacy, as a matter of obedience to God and faithfulness to Scripture.All who are married; especially those struggling, seeking the grace of God and the support of a Christian community to heal their relationship and reconcile them to their spouse.Those whose marriages have ended badly and who bear old burdens of grief or guilt.The divorced and remarried who may still encounter a spirit of condemnation in the Church.I have often said that I believe I was called to be the bishop of the whole diocese, not merely a part of it.  That remains my commitment.  I am available to talk and pray with you around any concerns you may have regarding any part of this letter.  I only ask again that, as we move forward, you hold in your own heart and prayers those whose views may be utterly different from your own, but who share with you the same hope in Christ.May the coming holy season of Advent serve as a time to renew our souls, quicken our repentance, and refresh our joy as together we await the celebration of the Savior’s birth.Faithfully your bishop,(The Right Reverend) Dorsey W.M. McConnell, D.D.The Bishop of PittsburghGuidelines for the Use of the RiteThe rite is permitted for local use as of The Feast of the Epiphany, January 6, 2014, by the rector or priest-in-charge of a parish, or by an assisting priest acting under the authority of that rector or priest-in-charge, within that parish.No priest may be compelled to use this rite in violation of his or her own conscience.The rite may be used outside the diocese by clergy canonically resident in the Diocese of Pittsburgh only by joint permission of the Bishop of Pittsburgh and of the bishop in the hosting diocese.The rite must be used according to its rubrics and may only be adapted within their provisions.  No other liturgy may be used for the blessing of same-sex covenants.It shall be the responsibility of any pastor contemplating the use of this rite to assess the likely pastoral and liturgical implications, and to address them with the couple, the parish leadership, and the bishop well in advance of the prospective date of its use.The Provisional Rite: An AssessmentThe new rite for blessing a lifelong covenant between people of the same sex is entitled “I Will Bless You, and You Will Be a Blessing.”  If I am correct in interpreting both the extensive prefatory material included in Resolution A049, as introduced and approved at the 2012 General Convention, as well as many public statements on the part of members of the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music, the intent of the Commission is eventually to establish this rite as matrimonial.  Consistent with this intention, the rite appears to follow the pattern of the celebration of matrimony as set forth in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer: an opening announcement, readings, an exchange of vows and rings, prayers and a final blessing over the couple.Beyond this general form, however, the similarities disappear.  The rite does not give a coherent statement of the nature and purpose of the covenant being celebrated.  It does not base its authority in Scriptural warrant.  There is no reference to bodily union.  Its understanding of the role of procreativity, while helpful in one regard, is ultimately compromised.  And the “theology of blessing” that pervades the liturgy is inadequate to establish the sacramental character of the rite.  I will briefly expand on these points in order, through a comparison of the 1979 rite of matrimony and the provisional rite of blessing.The rite of matrimony is clear in establishing the purpose of the covenant: lifelong union of man and woman “in heart, body and mind” for mutual joy, help, comfort, and procreation of children.  The authority of the rite is located in four specific Biblical warrants (Genesis, John, Ephesians and Hebrews) incorporated into the text of the opening instruction, and by several readings that refer specifically to marriage.  The bodily nature of the union is referred to at least twice (in the opening instruction and in the prayer for the couple “made one flesh in holy matrimony”), as is the procreation of children and the role of the parents as primary teachers of the Gospel.  Finally, the governing theology of the rite from beginning to end is rooted in the classical narrative of redemption – a good creation, fallen through sin, dead under the Law, redeemed by the Cross of Jesus Christ, and given new life through His Resurrection.  The couple signifies the totality of humanity, representing the image of God – once shattered in Eden – now restored in Christ.   The sacramental character of marriage, as with all sacramental rites, is shown to be transformative: the couple is changed, embodying the hope that we all may be changed, transformed by grace into a new creation.The provisional rite is unclear from the outset as to its nature and purpose.  The opening instruction mentions certain qualities the parties are supposed to demonstrate – such as strength and bravery – but the “love” that is referred to as the basis for the covenant is not further defined.  Is it sexual love?  Familial love?  Friendship?  A diverse set of Scriptures, beginning with the responsory reading from 1 John, are brought in to develop the general theme of “love,” but none sheds any light on the question of the covenant’s nature or purpose, and none rises to the level of a Biblical warrant.  Sexual congress is assumed, judging from the extensive prefatory material which includes guidelines for counseling the couple, but never actually mentioned.  Procreativity is referenced in the inclusion of existing children in the liturgy – to my mind the rite’s greatest strength – but the couple’s role in raising them is unclear. (For example, the children are to go “from strength to strength” but no mention is made of them being raised to know God, nor are the responsibilities of the adults toward them further defined.)Further, the “theology of blessing” throughout the provisional rite seems to be a deliberate departure from the classical narrative of redemption.  In the provisional rite, the creation remains wholly good, we are made to be a “blessing,” and the couple become (again, in a way unspecified) an affirmation and reminder of that good creation.  Some language from the narrative of redemption is sporadically used (e.g. “grace,” “new creation,” and even in one instance, the “saving work of Jesus”).  However, since in this “theology of blessing” all is apparently well and good, it is uncertain what that redemptive language means in this new context, what we might need to be saved from or saved to.  No transformation is necessary.  Since the very nature of sacrament entails transformation by means of grace, I am not sure what place sacraments could have in such a world.I note that Resolution A049 specifically charges the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music to review its work in the light of classical systematic theology.  This is hopeful.  However, if the intention of the rite is to establish a persuasive theological and liturgical case for the sacramental blessing of same sex unions, that case is at best unproved.  If it is further to establish a rite that may be used, at some point in the future, for matrimony of heterosexual couples, the replacement of a theology of redemption with a theology of blessing represents a  clear departure from our historic understanding of the Gospel.I will be conveying my thoughts to the Commission during this period in which it is seeking comment and feedback on the rite, and encourage others in the diocese to do the same.+D.McC.Summary Report: Conversations on Human Sexuality and CommunionIn January 2013, the Diocese of Pittsburgh began a process of dialogue among its members.  This process had two primary goals. The first was to learn a non-confrontational manner of discussing issues where there was disagreement. The second was to bring diverse people together to discuss issues concerning the blessing of same-sex covenants and the ordination of gay and lesbian clergy, and the larger topic of our life together.Two groups were formed to assist in the process: a Steering Committee, which worked in the early stages to help design the overall plan; and a prayer team, which provided on-going spiritual support. The format was structured by the Public Conversations Project, a consulting group that specializes in addressing topics where there is a deep divide among people. The dialogue design was tested by the Steering Committee, adjusted, used with two pilot groups in March and April, and then, following training of a corps of facilitators, rolled out to the diocese in June.During the period from June 27 through September 28, dialogues were held at St. Peter’s, Brentwood; St. Paul’s, Mt. Lebanon; St. Thomas, Oakmont; St. Mark’s, Johnstown; and St. Michael’s, Ligonier.  An invitation to participate was sent out in Grace Happens.  While 143 people signed up in response to this, about one-third of those were unable to participate, generally due to schedule constraints.  The ability to devote a full day was difficult for many.Thirty-two people participated in the January through April phase of the project. An additional 92 participated in the nine sessions held from June through September.Following an opening prayer provided by our prayer team, each session began with an explanation of the differences between debate and dialogue, with emphasis that the sessions were not for arguing or swaying the minds of others, but rather, hearing diverse views in a safe and confidential manner.  Participants then split into two groups, each containing those of similar views.  This allowed participants to practice the dialogue format of listen, think, speak before engaging with others who had different views.  The two groups were mixed for the afternoon session, which concluded with the question, “What could happen in the diocese over the next year that might enable moving forward together as the body of Christ?”  Responses were written on a flip chart, typed, and forwarded directly to Bishop McConnell for his review as part of his personal discernment on the issues.What did the participants convey to the bishop?  Six key themes emerged:The diocese needs to avoid making issues of human sexuality THE defining issue of the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh.  All need to focus on our common ground rather than on polarizing issues.  Diocesan goals and activities towards those goals need to be clear.Education is needed across the diocese on Episcopal polity at the congregational, diocesan, and national levels.  Education is also needed on the various interpretations of scriptural references to homosexuality and on current knowledge of human sexuality and sexual identity.No one should be marginalized due to their position on issues regarding human sexuality.  As a diocese, we have more than a decade of experience with marginalizing those who disagree.  This is not a Christian response.  Everyone needs to be heard and to feel that they have been heard.We need more time together.  Many commented on how fragmented we have become and how many parishes have isolated themselves from the diocese during the last decade.  If we are to become a strong diocese with a common focus, we need to devote the time to being together.  The more time we spend together, the more common ground and Christian love for each other we feel.  We need to do this through district and diocesan meetings.  We might develop sister parishes with whom we share worship, music, mission and outreach, and regular fellowship.What could happen?  Participants envisioned homosexuals being welcomed and heterosexuals not feeling threatened, because in thought, word and deed, all seek to make others comfortable and part of our worship community; that we realize the majesty of the faith we share makes our differences less consequential; and, that parishes would have latitude to operate within the historic Episcopal traditions of diversity and welcome, accepting the wisdom of the past while respecting the wisdom of the present.  It was also noted that some people may leave no matter what the decision.The conversations need to continue.  There was almost unanimous sentiment that this type of dialogue is good and needs to continue.  Suggestions were made that it happen at the district and congregational levels through the next year, both to help us discuss these issues as the diocese moves ahead and to allow a forum for other difficult topics to be discussed in a healthy way.We, the undersigned co-chairs, are grateful for the members of the Steering Committee who were so instrumental in helping us initially plan and refine our process: the Rev. Nancy Chalfant-Walker, Greg Davis, Alan Lewis, Mary Roehrich, and the Rev. Philip Wainwright.  We appreciate the support of the prayer team, led by Carol Gonzalez and the Rev. Kathy LaLonde.  We also thank our facilitators from PCP, Bob Stains and Mary Jacksteit.  And above all, we are indebted to the participants of these dialogue sessions for coming to them with open minds and caring hearts, and to all who supported the process in spirit and in prayer.In Christ,(The Right Reverend) Dorsey W.M. McConnell, D.D.The Bishop of PittsburghDana M. PhillipsCo-chairAdditional ResourcesA guide for those who wish to do further study of the provisional rite or to access materials referenced in this Pastoral Letter and accompanying documents:Resolution A049 to Authorize Liturgical Resources for Blessing Same-Gender Relationships:www.generalconvention.org/gc/resolutions“I Will Bless You and You Will Be a Blessing” (purchase or free download of the rite with one page theological summary): www.churchpublishing.org/products/index.cfm?fuseaction=productDetail&productID=9743Full SCLM theological statement (prefatory material) as prepared for the 77th General Convention: https://www.ctepiscopal.org/images/customer-files/I_Will_Bless_You_Corrected.pdfThe Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music: http://www.generalconvention.org/ccab/roster/399To contact SCLM: [email protected] Online Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SCLMSame-SexResourceFeedbackMission, Vision & Values Statement of the Diocese of Pittsburgh:www.episcopalpgh.org/resources/mission-vision-values Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments (2) Danielle A. Gaherty says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments are closed. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Posted Nov 26, 2013 Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rick Britton says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Human Sexuality, Submit a Press Release Featured Events Same-Sex Blessings Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY November 27, 2013 at 12:31 pm I am proud of Bishop’s McConnell’s decision to allow blessings of same sex couples as a priest in the church from the Diocese of Pittsburgh. It is wise and respectful to permit each priest of the diocese to make up his or her own mind regarding participation. It also speaks highly of the diocesan priests as they show mutual respect and maintain collegiality. Those of us in the Diocese of Tennessee who support the blessing and marriage of same sex couples are thankful for the witness and actions other Episcopal dioceses that permit blessings, same sex marriages and other acts of inclusion and justice for our LGBT brothers and sisters. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs November 26, 2013 at 11:54 pm I know that Pittsburgh is relatively close to 3 mile island. But it seems a nuclear reactor is nothing compared to Dorsey McConnell as a Bishop! I support your decision heartily, as an Episcopalian, Vestry member and as a member of Bishop’s Diocesan Executive Council in Connecticut. I only wish that action was shared by the Episcopate at large. Go Dorsey ! Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Pittsburgh clergy can exercise ‘local option’ on same-sex blessingslast_img read more

El Obispo de Connecticut no aspirará a presidir el Consejo…

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska El Rvdmo. Ian Douglas, obispo de Connecticut, y representante de la Iglesia Episcopal ante el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, comparte con sus compañeros de mesa durante una sesión reciente del CCA16, reunido en Lusaka, Zambia. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Lusaka, Zambia] El obispo de la Diócesis de Connecticut, Ian Douglas, uno de los tres miembros de la Iglesia Episcopal en el  Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, dijo el 12 de abril que no aspiraría en las elecciones a la presidencia de ese organismo.Douglas, en quien había muchas expectativas de que aspirara al cargo, envió una carta para explicar su decisión a los miembros del Comité Permanente del CCA que participaron en la reunión de ese grupo los días 6 y 7 de abril.“En tanto ruego que pueda seguir siendo de utilidad a la Comunión Anglicana de alguna manera en el futuro, creo que el que no aspire a la presidencia del CCA esta vez facilitará mejor nuestro andar juntos en unidad como Comunión Anglicana, y esa es mi mayor prioridad y mi más ferviente esperanza y oración”, decía Douglas en su carta.Douglas concluye su período tanto en el CCA como en el Comité Permanente  al término de esta reunión del CCA16. El CCA eligió a Douglas en 2009 para ser uno de sus representantes en el Comité Permanente.En su carta, Douglas, refiriéndose al fin de su período, dijo que prometía su “apoyo y oraciones constantes” por los miembros del Comité Permanente, nuevos y viejos, y por el secretario general de la Comunión Anglicana. “Dios bendiga a la Comunión Anglicana en nuestra diversidad y servicio común a la misión de Dios en Jesús a través del poder del Espíritu Santo”, escribió.Una mayoría de los líderes de las 38 provincias de la Comunión —a quienes se les conoce como primados— durante su reunión de enero demandaron tres años de “consecuencias”  para la Iglesia Episcopal en respuesta a la decisión de la 78ª. Convención General de cambiar el lenguaje canónico que define el matrimonio como [un vínculo que se contrae] entre un hombre y una mujer (Resolución A036) y autorizar dos nuevos ritos matrimoniales con un lenguaje que les permite ser usados tanto por parejas del mismo sexo como de sexos opuestos (Resolución A054).Los primados dijeron que “exigían” que durante esos tres años la Iglesia Episcopal no estuviera representada en organismos ecuménicos o interreligiosos, ni fuera nombrada o electa a un comité permanente interno, y “que si bien participara de los organismos internos de la Comunión Anglicana, no tomara parte en el proceso de la toma de decisiones ni en ningún asunto relativo a la doctrina o la forma de gobierno”.Douglas dijo en una entrevista el 12 de abril que su decisión de no aspirar “no era en respuesta al comunicado de los primados per se”. Más bien, mi criterio ha sido directamente influido por la relación que disfruto aquí en el CCA y por mi compromiso de fomentar la unidad de la Comunión Anglicana”.Al término de su reunión del 6 y 7 de abril, el Comité Permanente del CCA dio a conocer un informe en el que afirmaba “los vínculos de relación entre los Instrumentos de la Comunión en que cada instrumento, incluido el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, desarrolla sus propios puntos de vista y tiene sus propias responsabilidades”.En una declaración emitida el 11 de abril, el obispo Josiah Idowu-Fearon, secretario general de la Comunión Anglicana, reconoció que a ningún miembro del CCA podía impedírsele que fuera nominado al Comité Permanente. “Sin embargo, durante su primer día en sesión”, escribió Idowu-Fearon, “el arzobispo Justin presentó un informe al CCA de la Reunión de los Primados. Tal como lo prometiera, él le pidió al CCA que trabajara con los primados por el bienestar de toda la Comunión”.Las nominaciones para la presidencia del CCA cierran al mediodía del 13 de abril y la elección está fijada para el 15 de abril. Las nominaciones para la vicepresidencia y los miembros del Comité Permanente cierran el 16 de abril y la elección viene el 18 de abril.Douglas, que fue cuatro veces diputado a la Convención General antes de ser electo obispo de Connecticut en 2009, fue parte del grupo de planificación de la Conferencia de Lambeth de obispos anglicanos 2008 y ha sido miembro de la Comisión Permanente Interanglicana sobre Misión y Evangelización, así como asesor de Educación Teológica en la Comunión Anglicana. El anterior arzobispo de Cantórbery Rowan Williams le concedió a Douglas la Cruz de San Agustín, el más alto galardón de la Comunión Anglicana, por su labor en la Conferencia de Lambeth. Más información sobre Douglas pueden encontrarse aquí.Antes de la próxima reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, la cual se espera tenga lugar en 2019, el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal elegirá al obispo que ha de representarla en el CCA. La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, es el miembro del clero y la diputada Rosalie Ballentine de la Diócesis de Islas Vírgenes es la miembro laico. Jennings asiste a su segunda reunión y Ballentine a la primera. Los miembros del CCA sirven por tres períodos.Entérese más acerca del Consejo Consultivo AnglicanoEl CCA es uno de los cuatro instrumentos de la Comunión, siendo los otros tres el arzobispo de Cantórbery (que preside el CCA), la Conferencia de Lambeth de los Obispos Anglicanos y la Reunión de los Primados. Al arzobispo de Cantórbery (que es el presidente del CCA) se le ve como el “centro de la unidad” de estos tres instrumentos.Creado en 1969, el CCA incluye entre sus delegados a clérigos y laicos, así como a obispos. La membresía incluye de una a tres personas de cada una de las 38 provincias  de la Comunión Anglicana. [La delegación] que tiene tres miembros, consta de un obispo, un sacerdote y un laico. En la que cuenta con menos miembros, la preferencia se le da a los laicos.El Consejo, por lo general, se reúne cada tres o cuatro años y la reunión de Lusaka es la 16ª. sesión del Consejo. La primera reunión se celebró en Limurú, Kenia, en 1971. La última reunión del CCA sesionó a fines de 2012 en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda. El CCA no se ha reunido en África desde su novena reunión en Ciudad del Cabo, Sudáfrica, en 1993.La lista de [los asistentes] al CCA se encuentra aquí.La información actualizada de ENS sobre el CCA puede encontrarse aquí.La página de noticias de la Cámara de Diputados también está publicando artículos sobre la reunión.A los comunicados de Twitter se accede con #ACCLusaka.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET ACC16, Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Por Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Apr 12, 2016 Anglican Consultative Council El Obispo de Connecticut no aspirará a presidir el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

House of Bishops Spring 2017 meeting: Video Daily Account for…

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab House of Bishops Spring 2017 meeting: Video Daily Account for March 12 Tags [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut, left, and Bishop Anne Hodges-Copple of North Carolina offer insights on the third day of the House of Bishops meeting, March 12, at Kanuga Conference Center in North Carolina.3:26 Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Mar 13, 2017 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK House of Bishops Spring 2017, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Video Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC House of Bishops, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

Anglican network calls for Communion-wide support for indigenous people’s rights

first_img Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Members of the Anglican Indigenous Network gather after a Eucharist at Epiphany Church in Kaimuki, Hawaii. Photo: Bruce Hanohano/Diocese of Hawaii[Anglican Communion News Service] A gathering of the Anglican Indigenous Network (AIN) in Hawaii has led to a call for a greater voice for indigenous Anglicans in the work of the Anglican Consultative Council and its partner organisations.Representatives from 10 Pīhopatanga o Aotearoa (Maori dioceses in New Zealand) joined with Anglicans from Australia, the U.S. and Canada for a week-long program at Epiphany Episcopal Church in Kaimuki, which was chaired by Bishop of Tai Tokerau Te Kitohi Pikaahu.Read the full article here. Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Posted Nov 25, 2019 Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Indigenous Ministries Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Anglican network calls for Communion-wide support for indigenous people’s rights Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

Charlottesville’s Confederate statues in limbo, with Episcopal clergy hopeful for…

first_imgCharlottesville’s Confederate statues in limbo, with Episcopal clergy hopeful for their removal Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Charlottesville, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Racial Justice & Reconciliation Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By David PaulsenPosted Jul 2, 2020 Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel George Floyd, Advocacy Peace & Justice, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA A sign reading “Hate Has No Home Here” hangs by the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2018. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] A month of nationwide protests against systemic racism and violence against African Americans has added urgency to efforts to remove Confederate imagery and symbols from public display. In Virginia, a law took effect July 1 lifting a key legal barrier to the removal of Confederate statues. But in Charlottesville, the wait continues.Three years ago, Charlottesville was the epicenter of a renewed national debate over the legacy of slavery and the Confederacy after a white supremacist rally in August 2017 ended in clashes and violence, including the killing of a counterprotester. The hate groups said they chose Charlottesville in opposition to the city’s plan to remove its statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.Episcopalians joined others in the community in disavowing white supremacy, demonstrating alongside the counterprotesters. A month later, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry traveled to Charlottesville for a pastoral visit that emphasized the racial healing efforts of the three Episcopal churches in the city.Charlottesville’s Confederate statues remain in place for now, however, because of a court injunction against their removal. The one depicting Lee astride his horse is impossible for the Rev. Paul Walker to ignore. As rector of Christ Episcopal Church in downtown Charlottesville, Walker’s office overlooks Emancipation Park, home to the Lee statue.“I’m looking at it right now,” Walker told Episcopal News Service by phone on July 1. He’s encouraged by the recent momentum against Confederate symbols, but time will tell whether it leads to the removal of Charlottesville’s statues of Lee and Stonewall Jackson, another Confederate general.“There’s been so much back and forth with it, I don’t put a whole lot of stock in anything until it actually happens,” Walker said.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, left, stands at the foot of the Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Sept. 7, 2017, with the Rev. Paul Walker, rector of the nearby Christ Episcopal Church. The statue had been wrapped in plastic while the city fought a legal challenge to the monument’s removal. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceProtests against racial injustice have been widespread in cities across the United States, including Charlottesville, since the May 25 killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In addition to bolstering the push for criminal justice reforms, the deaths of Floyd and other recent Black victims of police brutality and white vigilantism have prompted cities and states to reconsider the appropriateness of Confederate imagery in public spaces.Mississippi bowed to renewed pressure last month and agreed to retire its state flag, which featured a depiction of the Confederate battle flag. And in Richmond, Virginia, Mayor Levar Stoney vowed to get rid of the city’s prominent Confederate statues on Monument Avenue. Protesters in Richmond toppled a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis on June 10, and on July 1, the city, once the capital of the Confederacy, began removing other statues, starting with Stonewall Jackson.Today, Mayor @LevarStoney, using his emergency powers, ordered the immediate removal of multiple monuments in the city, including Confederate statues. Watch this video to learn more. Read the release here: https://t.co/QjnAB1gZM8 https://t.co/stmK3eePVs— City of Richmond, VA (@CityRichmondVA) July 1, 2020“It’s time to move beyond the lost cause and embrace the righteous cause,” Stoney told NPR. “We can be more than just the capital of the Confederacy. It’s time for us to be the capital of compassion.”The law that took effect July 1 initiated a process for Virginia communities to collect public input on their Confederate monuments and then potentially remove them. A previous state law barred removal or changes to war monuments or memorials, even when such actions had majority support.In February 2017, the Charlottesville City Council approved the removal of the Lee statue. Later that year, after hate groups converged on the city Aug. 11 and 12, the City Council voted unanimously to remove the Jackson statue as well.But the statues’ removal never occurred because a preservationist group calling itself the Monument Fund sued the city, saying the plan violated the state law protecting war memorials. In April 2019, a Virginia judge agreed, blocking the city from removing the statues.Then this year, Virginia’s General Assembly passed legislation easing those restrictions on cities. Gov. Ralph Northam signed the bill into law on April 11, though it didn’t take effect until this month.The Southern Poverty Law Center estimated in 2019 that more than 1,700 Confederate symbols remained on public display around the country, including more than 100 monuments in Virginia, despite increased efforts to have them removed. Most of the tributes to Confederate history were erected decades after the end of the Civil War, at a time when proponents of the Lost Cause myth sought to portray the Confederacy as a failed but noble campaign, downplaying its roots in defending slavery.Charlottesville’s statues remain in limbo, still bound by the judge’s injunction, but on June 5, the Monument Fund essentially ceded defeat. It filed a motion acknowledging the change in law and asking that the injunction be modified accordingly.“We’re not looking to drag this out any further; the Monument Fund’s argument has always been that the City Council’s actions did not comply with the law,” spokesman Charles Weber told the Daily Progress. “The law has changed and now there’s a clear process for removal that respects both sides of the issue.”The city has appealed the case to the Virginia Supreme Court seeking final clearance to remove the statues.Protests in Charlottesville after Floyd’s killing have included specific calls for the statues’ removal, including a recent march from downtown to the University of Virginia, said Walker, the Christ Church rector. The fate of the statues and related issues of racial injustice are “particularly raw for us in Charlottesville” because of what happened in August 2017, he said.“I have found the protests heartening, because it seems to have coalesced a large group of people around the issues of police violence and equitable policy,” said Walker, whose mostly white congregation dates to 1820.At Trinity Episcopal Church, a historically Black congregation northwest of downtown that now includes a multicultural mix of parishioners, some members of the congregation are active in the recent protests, according to the Rev. Cass Bailey, Trinity’s vicar.“I think people are cautiously optimistic,” Bailey told ENS. “There seems to be broader momentum around addressing some of these issues.”The church, founded in 1919, has long been involved in social justice advocacy work, he said, so “it’s not new to us.” But he senses other congregations now are willing to take up that work as well. On a recent Zoom meeting with diocesan clergy leaders, planning church responses to systemic racism dominated the conversation.“I think it’s still very much a prominent issue for members of the congregation, as well as people in the city of Charlottesville,” Bailey said. As long as the statues remain standing, he said, they will remain powerful symbols of white supremacy.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Tampa, FL Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

The Apopka news year in review: The race for Apopka Mayor…

first_img December 28, 2017 at 10:59 am Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Well today is the day! Happy Birthday to me! I am getting better, not just older! I played happy birthday songs off of you tube, for me and my dog. My little boy dog really responded to the chipmunk happy birthday song and sang along with it!….LOL…. He listens intently to any child voices or anything that would be something that children kind of sound like. He is really tuned in to children. Editor’s Note: This is the third in a series of 24 articles published by The Apopka Voice in 2017 that were among the most noteworthy. We will post all of them beginning today and ending on Sunday, December 31st. Then on Monday, January 1st we will poll our readers and let them decide which is Apopka’s biggest story of 2017.Story #3: Kilsheimer and Nelson announced their plans to run for Apopka Mayor within 24 hours of each other, and almost a year in advance of Election Day.Published on March 15th and 16thMarch 15th – Since last summer, the biggest questions in Apopka politics has been if Orange County Commissioner Bryan Nelson will oppose Joe Kilsheimer for Mayor of Apopka in 2018. That speculation is over.Kilsheimer announced that he will run for re-election at the end of tonight’s city council meeting.Nelson all-but-announced his candidacy this evening on social media; “Big news tomorrow. Press release tomorrow at the Catfish Place 11:00. Everyone invited,” Nelson said on Facebook. “Plenty to do. Will need help from everyone.”Nelson is a first-term County Commissioner for District 2 which represents all of Apopka, Plymouth, Zellwood and parts of Ocoee, Orlando and Eatonville. He is also Vice Mayor of Orange County. Before that, he was in the Florida House representing District 38 for six years (2006-2012) and District 31 for two years (2012-2014). Both districts included Apopka within its borders.He is also the owner of Nelson Insurance Services in Apopka for approximately the past 20 years and Nelson’s Roses for 20 years prior to that. He has lived in the Apopka area since 1958, and at the residence that he annexed into Apopka (in 2016) for 23 years.Apopka Mayor Joe KilsheimerCounty Commissioner Bryan Nelson Reply Please enter your comment! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Ol’ Roy Moore, isn’t he a “trip”? He has filed a lawsuit alleging voter fraud, because he lost the election. This also causes the Democrat who won, beating him out, to not be allowed to be sworn in, and vote on upcoming legislation, until this matter is resolved, is what I understand. Should we have expected anything different from ol’ Roy Moore? Sounds like a sore loser, a case of sour grapes….Look, when you choose to ride to the polls, to cast your vote for yourself on horseback, wearing a cowboy hat, maybe just maybe, there were some voters who thought he was a little too “wild west” to get their votes, among other things, we had heard about him in the news….and I happen to like horses, just not him! The announcements will set up a Nelson vs. Kilsheimer election that could prove to be both candidate’s greatest challenge. Kilsheimer is an incumbent that has never lost an Apopka municipal election (2 wins no losses) and defeated a five-decade incumbent (Mayor John Land) in 2014. Nelson is also undefeated (5-0 with two elections going unopposed), and has been in an election every two years since 2006.Nelson makes his candidacy for mayor official: Begins campaign with petition driveMarch 16th – With The Catfish Place Restaurant as the backdrop, Orange County Commissioner Bryan Nelson made his candidacy for mayor of Apopka known to the public. “After several long discussions with my family and close friends, I have decided to run for mayor here in our great city of Apopka,” he told the gathered crowd. “I am excited about the opportunity to serve in a new role and will bring my passion for our city to this campaign. I want to work on what we can do to make Apopka a better place to live, to work and to play.”In his prepared statement, and in his speech, Nelson referenced civility as an issue he would like to change in the current City Council meetings.“We’ve got a lot of opportunities, but we have a lot of challenges as well,” he said. “There has to be civility in leadership. We’ve got to get that back. You can’t let your emotions get in the way of good policy.”He also announced his first campaign event, which will be a kick-off fundraiser to be held at The Catfish Place on Sunday, March 26th from 4:00 to 6:00 PM.Nelson is pursuing a unique strategy by filing by petition instead of paying the filing fee.Bryan Nelson, his wife Debbie (r) and daughter Linda (l) completing the first candidate petitions.“No one has ever qualified for mayor by petition. We are going to be the first. It shows fiscal responsibility and that you have community support.”Nelson is a first-term County Commissioner for District 2 which represents all of Apopka, Plymouth, Zellwood and parts of Ocoee, Orlando and Eatonville. He is also Vice Mayor of Orange County. Before that, he was in the Florida House representing District 38 for six years (2006-2012) and District 31 for two years (2012-2014). Both districts included Apopka within its borders.He is also the owner of Nelson Insurance Services in Apopka for approximately the past 20 years and Nelson’s Roses for 20 years before that. He has lived in the Apopka area since 1958, and at the residence that he annexed into Apopka (in 2016) for 23 years.The announcement sets up an anticipated showdown against Mayor Joe Kilsheimer that could prove to be both candidate’s greatest challenge. Kilsheimer is an incumbent that has never lost an Apopka municipal election (2 wins no losses). He defeated a five-decade incumbent (Mayor John Land) in 2014.Nelson is also undefeated (5-0 with two elections going unopposed), and has been in an election every two years since 2006.Mayor Kilsheimer: “We created more than 1,000 jobs in the projects we approved”March 16th – At last night’s City Council meeting, Mayor Joe Kilsheimer announced his candidacy for re-election to a second term as mayor of Apopka.“I’ll close the Mayor’s Report by ending a lot of speculation. It seems the campaign season is upon us. I had a person tell me they heard I wasn’t running for mayor. So I’m going to announce tonight that I am going to be a candidate for re-election next year. We’ll all look forward to seeing what happens in the coming months.”The Apopka Voice asked Mayor Kilsheimer to tell Apopka voters why he wants to be re-elected. He sent this statement:Mayor Joe Kilsheimer: In his own wordsMayor Joe Kilsheimer Since I took office in 2014, here are the positive changes that have taken place in Apopka:We have created more than 1,000 new jobs in the projects we have approved such as Florida Hospital, Qorvo, the Northwest Distribution Center, Tractor Supply, Raynor Shine and others.We have brought in more than $1.5 million in federal and state grants. With these grant funds, we will this year: 1) Rebuild the community center at Alonzo Williams Park; 2) Rebuild Lake Avenue Park; Install new playground equipment at Kit Land Nelson Park; 4) Hire 10 police officers instead of the five we originally budgeted for and 5) Equip our fire department with more training and safety gear.We have signed a development deal for a new City Center project that will anchor the revitalization of downtown Apopka.We have struck an innovative deal for the construction of a new interchange on S.R. 414 at Marden Road. This will not only improve access to the new hospital but will create new opportunities for investment and jobs for Apopka.We have completed the Grow Apopka 2025 Vision Plan, which solicited the opinions of Apopka residents and laid the foundation for future projects such as the Station Street District, the 6th Street Promenade and the Lake Apopka Restoration Center, or LARC.We have established a summer youth employment program called Apopka Youth Works. This summer, our nationally recognized program will provide summer jobs for 100 young people from low- and moderate-income families.We have launched a new, attractive city website.We have more than tripled the City’s audience on social media platforms, allowing us to communicate with residents on a daily basis.We have established a far more transparent government than Apopka has ever had before. We post the full agenda and city council packet online on the Fridays before a next-Wednesday council meeting.We have updated and modernized numerous systems within the operation of our municipal government, including an overhaul of our IT system to put it on a modern Microsoft platform.We are holding more events than ever at the Apopka Amphitheater, including Charlie Daniels tomorrow night, (March 17th).We can now buy alcohol on Sundays.That is a good beginning, but we have so much more to do. I am running for re-election because I want to finish the job I started: Setting Apopka up for success.Apopka has so much potential. The opening of the Wekiva Parkway is only a few years away. Our job now is to shape our community so that we hold on to the small-town atmosphere we love so much, and prepare for the growth we know lies ahead.With the help and support of Apopka residents, I look forward to carrying out their vision in a second term. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here December 28, 2017 at 11:30 am TAGS2018 Mayoral ElectionApopka Mayor Joe KilsheimerOrange County Commissioner Bryan Nelson Previous articleThe Apopka news year in review: City issues Cease Discharge Order to AnuviaNext articleThe Apopka news year in review: Apopka Hop Pale Ale makes its debut Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR December 28, 2017 at 11:23 am Now I have to wonder….was that an city rat?….LOL, or a county rat? LOL Reply December 28, 2017 at 10:49 amcenter_img Mama Mia Mama Mia Please enter your name here Mama Mia Reply Mama Mia Reply Apopka City Hall 5 COMMENTS December 28, 2017 at 10:52 am Mayor Kilsheimer sure is getting a lot of Orlando Sentinel front page news coverage here of lately. All the time, as they are giving him coverage about his opinions of things regarding our city, CRAs, how the Florida legislators are pushing for bills, he doesn’t like, alcohol subject, medical marijuana subject of dispensaries, and you name it…..they sure are giving him the “big head” so to speak! Enough already! Mama Mia We stopped in at the Wawa last night for my husband to get cigarettes. There was a guy there in front of our truck, along the frontage wall hanging out, so my husband told me to lock the door on our truck, while I waited in the truck for him to come back out of the store. As my husband came back out, there were three girls there and the guy hanging out, and I saw my husband talking to all of them, and when he got back in the truck, I asked him did they ask for money or gas, as I saw him talking to them, and he said no, they didn’t. What he was talking to them about, and why two of the girls screamed and ran into the store real fast was because a big huge field rat with a very longggggggg tail ran right along the wall in the front of Wawa in front of my husband as he came out of the store, and he told the girls to watch out for the big rat! We are used to people asking for money or gas there all the time, but a big field rat was totally unexpected! Where oh where, did that thing come from????? Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more