Swiss doctor pans plastic visors after COVID-19 hits restaurant workers

first_imgThe Grisons cantonal doctor, Marina Jamnicki, said face masks for restaurant staff who cannot keep 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) distance from others were a better solution than transparent plastic shields secured by a headband.”An analysis of the cases and the path in which the disease spread shows plastic visors being used in gastronomy don’t offer sufficient protection,” her office said. “People who wore visors got infected.”The Swiss Federal Health Office did not return queries about potential action, given Jamnicki’s warning.Marc Tischhauser, director of the Grisons restaurant industry association, told Reuters the doctor’s warning was a reminder that visors play a “complementary role” in protecting against COVID-19 infections, and that proper social distancing and face masks are also necessary to be effective. The top doctor in the Swiss mountain region that includes St. Moritz and Davos told restaurants on Tuesday not to rely on plastic visors to protect their employees from COVID-19 infections, saying they “create a false sense of security”.The warning, from the Grisons canton bordering Italy and Austria, raises questions about the reopening strategies of some restaurants, hotels and other tourist-dependent businesses.In Germany some states allow visors for service workers, while others require face masks. Swiss restaurants don’t require all workers to wear protective facial coverings, though some have adopted them. The World Health Organization last month updated guidance urging face masks be worn in public, while conceding only observational evidence, not scientific studies, showed they helped contain the new coronavirus’s spread.Germany’s Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for public health said masks are better because they “slow the speed of breath or the dispersion of spit and slime drops” while visors “just capture drops that land on the screen”.Germany’s 16 states have final say in what to require.In Hessen, where Frankfurt is located, service workers can use visors, while Bavaria’s health office advises they can be used “only to reinforce a mask covering the mouth and nose”.A similar debate is taking place in the United States.Many airlines in European countries including Germany, Italy and France require masks that cover the nose and mouth. Qatar Airways requires passengers to wear both a mask and face shield. Topics :last_img read more

Governor Wolf Discusses the Impact of Funding Increases in Delaware County during “Schools that Teach” Roundtable and Tour

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Press Release,  Schools That Teach Upper Darby, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today continued his “Schools That Teach” tour in Delaware County, where he heard from teachers and administrators in the Upper Darby School District about their plans to ensure that education funding from his 2015-16 budget goes directly into the classroom.“Pennsylvania ranks near the bottom in the country in state funding for K through 12 education and my proposed budget makes historic investments at all levels – early childhood education through higher education,” said Governor Wolf. “After years of funding cuts that resulted in the loss of educators, increased class sizes, and cuts to valuable programs, I want to ensure that the new funding in my budget reaches the classroom and directly impacts student achievement. Focusing on education will allow us to lay the foundation for long-term economic growth.”In a roundtable discussion at Stonehurst Hills Elementary School, Governor Wolf heard from school leaders and stakeholders about their plans to use increased funding for professional development and for the restoration of programs and personnel, particularly reading specialists and math coaches.“This is an important opportunity for districts to have comprehensive conversations about how to invest this funding on proven resources and programs that will improve student learning,” Governor Wolf said. “What is being proposed here in the Upper Darby School District is a prime example of a plan that will ensure this historic education investment reaches the classroom while providing clear benchmarks to measure the results of student achievement.”“When this district had the proper resources and funding, we were improving the academic standing of our students, which, in turn, had a positive impact on the morale of the district and community,” Upper Darby School District Superintendent Dr. Richard Dunlap said. “With proper funding and resources, we believe that we can achieve student success that would mirror, or even surpass, the success that we recognized prior to the state budget cuts.”In March, Department of Education Acting Secretary Pedro Rivera sent a letter to superintendents in all 500 districts detailing accountability measures to ensure the education funding proposed in Governor Wolf’s 2015-2016 budget is spent directly on students in the classroom to allow them to compete in a modern economy. In the letter, Acting Secretary Rivera called on districts to submit plans to ensure this new investment reaches the classroom and to measure results for Pennsylvania’s students.MEDIA CONTACT: Jeff Sheridan – 717.783.1116# # # May 21, 2015center_img Governor Wolf Discusses the Impact of Funding Increases in Delaware County during “Schools that Teach” Roundtable and Tourlast_img read more