Remembering The Incredible “Concert For New York City” In The Wake Of 9/11 [Watch]

first_imgFollowing the tragic and horrific events of September 11th, 2001, New York City quickly galvanized in a way I had never witnessed. Everyone was searching for answers that would never be found, and we all realized that we had to return to our normal lives in one way or another. The grieving would have to stop, and, in lieu of that void, a celebration of life began.I was lucky to witness New York Mets superstar Mike Piazza and his towering home run against the Atlanta Braves on September 21st in person. It seemed like the first moment of true celebration since the towers came down. My family went home that night and stayed up late watching the America: A Tribute To Heroes telethon, which was broadcast on all of the major networks. Musical performances were provided by Bruce Springsteen, Stevie Wonder, Dave Matthews, Paul Simon, Willie Nelson and more to help raise $200 Million in aide and relief efforts. It was incredible, however this was just a warm-up for the outpouring of love and positivity that would come with the expertly executed Concert for New York City.The Concert for New York City was, by all means, the night that we as a city (and as a country) howled into the night in jubilation and celebration. The show featured a ridiculous lineup of rock icons mixed in which speeches by major politicians, skits by comedians, and short-films by New York filmmakers. Paul McCartney organized the event, and made sure to bring a ton of his musical friends from the U.K. as a sign of solidarity. Mick Jagger & Keith Richards, The Who, and Elton John all performed at the event, as did reclusive New York transplant David Bowie. McCartney made sure to include a ton of American talent as well, with James Taylor, Jay-Z, Destiny’s Child, Melissa Ethridge, Goo Goo Dolls, and Backstreet Boys all featured alongside the British icons. It was a truly impressive effort, and I remember being in complete awe of the lineup when it was announced. America had been attacked for our way of life, and our response was to showcase the brightest and most talented artists of our time. The event was slated to take place on October 20th at the mecca of American entertainment, NYC’s Madison Square Garden.While the show featured several standout performances, it was the night’s opener that immediately connected with the audience. David Bowie opened the night with a beautiful solo take on Simon and Garfunkel‘s “America”. Bowie followed up with a short speech: “Hi, friends. Hi, fellow New Yorkers. I’d particularly like to say hello to the folks from my local ladder, you know where you are. I must say, it’s an absolute privilege to play for you tonight.” Bowie then launched into a celebratory version of “Heroes”. It was at this point that the cameras showed the audience, filled with police officers, firefighters, first responders, and the families of those lost in the tragedy. An emotional reveal for sure, and a powerful moment for all in the room, as all of these heroes weren’t seen mourning; rather, they were smiling, cheering, and celebrating life with each other, waving American flags throughout the evening and going crazy for their favorite musicians.Watch David Bowie perform Simon & Garfunkel’s “America” and his own “Heroes” at the Concert For New York City below: The other set that sticks out is the powerful, earth-shattering performance by veteran rockers The Who. Actor John Cusack, clearly a huge fan of the band, went absolutely wild when introducing them as he was surrounded by a sea of equally excited first responders. The band kicked off their set with a super-charged “Who Are You”, with Pete Townshend showcasing his wild guitar windmills all the while. The next track, “Baba O’Riley”, saw the audience bursting with energy, drowning out Roger Daltrey‘s vocals as they screamed the song’s “teenage wasteland” refrain. “Behind Blue Eyes” provided an emotional moment, before “Won’t Get Fooled Again” brought the roars back to MSG. The crowd ate up The Who’s passionate performance, and it served as the night’s greatest highlight. “Won’t Get Fooled Again” served as a rallying cry that evening, and it became the theme of the night, as well as the theme of an entire generation of Americans.Watch the entire powerful performance by The Who at the Concert for New York City, courtesy of Daily Motion’s IvorTheEngineDriver. The night contained plenty of other standout performances, almost too many to count. Many of the entertainers had close ties to New York City in one way or another; Billy Crystal performed a comedy routine; New Jersey hero Bon Jovi performed hits like “Living on a Prayer” and “Wanted Dead Or Alive”; Brooklyn-boy Jay-Z performed “Izzo” (H.O.V.A.)”; Adam Sandler reprised his role as Operaman from Saturday Night Live for a raucous, Osama Bin Laden-themed comedy bit that had the crowd doubled over with laughter.Billy Joel took the stage to a huge ovation, and he returned the energy in kind with energetic performances of “Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)” and a show-stopping version of “New York State of Mind”. Elton John delivered a standout version of “Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters” before his brother in keys, Billy Joel, returned to the stage to perform an excellent duet performance of “Your Song”. And, of course, the evening’s organizer, Paul McCartney, performed the show’s finale. He delivered a six-song set that included emotional takes on “Yesterday” and “Let It Be”, as well as the debut of his song “Freedom”, which had been written as a response to the attacks. He encouraged the crowd to clap along with the song’s beat, providing a true moment of togetherness between the audience and quite possibly the world’s most legendary living musician. He performed the new number while surrounded by giddy first responders form the NYPD and NYFD.The benefit concert, which was aired live on MTV sister network VH1, raised $35 Million over the course of its broadcast. The concert would go on to be considered one of the most important nights in modern musical history, and in the long and winding history of New York City. For one night, the entire city and country was aligned in celebration, in mourning, and in togetherness. It set the tone for all of us to finally move forward, with the entire city buying into the “won’t get fooled again” mantra that The Who had provided. It was an unbelievable night indeed, and all who witnessed it at MSG or on television at home saw something special, unique, and perfect.The Concert for New York City is available for viewing on YouTube for a ridiculously low price of $3.99, which you can access by clicking here. The run-time is just under five hours, and contains all of the night’s performances and short-films. It may be fifteen years later, but the raw emotion and feelings of unity feel just as strong today as they did all those years ago. It made a huge impression on me as a teenager, the impact of which I can still feel to this day. Music provided the ultimate moment of peace, release, togetherness, and relief. It was a remarkable, inspirational night that showcased the awesome power of artistic expression.Peace and love to everyone affected by the attacks on September 11th, 2001. Thanks to all of the first responders for their heroics, and thanks to my beloved New York City for turning such a tragedy into so much positivity and togetherness.Listen to Paul McCartney’s 9/11-inspired anthem “Freedom”, performed live at the Concert for New York City, courtesy of YouTube user nowhereman113.last_img read more

Students reflect on academic accommodations

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the third day in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s story examines students’ experiences with academic accommodations at the University and the College.Megan Crowley, a freshman at Notre Dame, has Pompe disease, which progressively weakens muscles.Editor’s note: Crowley spoke to The Observer with the assistance of her nurse, Debbie Larsen, who is quoted below.Crowley said when she was looking at colleges, she specifically looked at the accommodations available at Notre Dame.“When she’s taking an exam, she gets double the time. Not because she has trouble processing the information — it just takes her a very long time to write it down,” Larsen said. “The other thing was to have it in a room where you’re not disturbing your classmates, basically, by taking the test and taking such a long time.”In lecture-style classes, Crowley said she has note takers to supplement her own notes. In discussion-based classes, Crowley speaks and her statement is repeated by the caretaker accompanying her.“If by any means that person is gone or leaves, she does have a friend in the class that can translate if necessary,” Larsen said. “But she thinks that if nobody was with her, she wouldn’t be called on. They just wouldn’t want to have difficulty understanding her, or embarrassing her, and she understands that.”Junior Grace Agolia, who is deaf and uses a cochlear implant, said accommodations offered through the Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilities played a role in her decision to attend Notre Dame.“Some colleges don’t have good offices of disability services, but Notre Dame’s is quite excellent. Scott Howland is the man. He is awesome, and so are all the other staff members at Sara Bea,” she said.Agolia said she submitted an individualized education plan (IEP), as well as documentation from her audiologist, and met with the office at the beginning of the year to explain the sort of accommodations she required, which include CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation).“The Office of Disability Services here hires a company called Michiana Reporters — basically court stenographers — who come in and they type, in real time, everything that is said in the classroom,” she said. “It appears on an iPad on my desk, and the transcripts are sent to me after class. They’re confidential transmissions, so no one else gets to see them, just me, just in case I miss something in class.”Agolia said she also uses an FM system, “which consists of a teacher-worn microphone, and a receiver, that I plug into my cochlear implant.”“It amplifies the teacher’s voice and transmits that amplification directly to my cochlear implant, so no one hears the amplification but me,” she said. “It’s really nice if the teacher’s back is turned, or if there is some background noise going on. It helps me to hear what they’re saying better.”Agolia said she also receives extended time on tests because of delayed auditory processing.“This is something a lot of people don’t understand. They look at me, they [say], ‘Oh you do fine hearing one-on-one conversations, you seem to do really well in class, all these things. Plus, the exam is visual, it’s written — why do you need extended time for that if your disability is a hearing one?’” she said. “The thing is, with auditory processing, the way my cochlear implant works with my brain, the auditory processing is always delayed.“You are going to hear something much sooner than I’m going to hear something. So I probably have a five second delay because my brain is always asking, ‘Is this what I heard?’ and then it’s asking, ‘What is this information about?’ So the processing comes a second later because the focus is on the actual hearing.”Although her accommodation requests have been consistent over time, Agolia said she did not have CART until she came to Notre Dame.“The college environment — the classes are a lot bigger at Notre Dame — so it was going to be harder for me to hear other people in the classroom, especially people behind me, because I like to sit in the front row, to hear,” she said. “Also, if I just had the FM system and taking notes, I’m basically trying to write down what I’m hearing.“All the processing of the information comes a lot later, so it is helpful to have CART there to do some of the notetaking for me. And especially if it’s stuff that I can’t hear, so that later I can look at it and say, ‘That makes sense now.’”Classes involving group discussions are difficult, Agolia said, because she is always looking at the transcript displayed in front of her.“Sometimes the transcript is not always accurate, and that’s just something you have to deal with because it’s a phonetic keyboard. Sometimes I can figure it out, based on the phonetic spelling of the sounds, but still by the time I read it and then figure it out, the discussion has already moved to the next person, so it’s a constant game of playing catch-up,” she said. “It is more difficult, especially when I want to make a contribution to the discussion and think of something much later, and the discussion has already moved on — it’s awkward to share that.”Agolia said the majority of her professors and classmates have been very understanding of her requests for accommodations.“I have had one or two teachers who have not been as open to certain aspects of the accommodations, which was an issue for me, and it was difficult to deal with. We eventually were able to reach a compromise, but it was still hard on my end because I had to put extra time into the class and that took away time from other things,” she said.Elizabeth Anthony, a senior with autoimmune conditions, said her professors have been very understanding of her request for accommodations.“There have been a couple of times when I’ve had to have very frank conversations, like, ‘I’m sorry, I’m horribly sick and this is why, and I can’t do this,’” she said. “And they’ve always been really understanding. I’ve been really impressed at how many of my professors have taken a very personal interest in me, or have, once I told them, been so supportive, which has been awesome.”Ross Kloeber, a first-year law student who is hard of hearing, said his experience with disability services has been very positive and “pretty straightforward,” though the availability of resources has not been prominently advertised.“There’s not a lot of outreach — it’s not necessarily different than anywhere else,” he said. “There might have been an email or something like that, but they’re not going to come find you — you have to go to them.”Kloeber said the accommodations he receives as a law student are of better quality than those he received at his undergraduate institution.“I don’t know how much of that is because the accommodations are getting better or the actual services the school provides,” he said.Fiona Van Antwerp, a sophomore with dyslexia, said the Disabilities Resource Office (DRO) at Saint Mary’s played a large role in her college choice.“A lot of schools couldn’t guarantee accommodations, some big, some small,” Van Antwerp said.When she met Iris Giamo, director of the DRO, Van Antwerp said she felt comfortable Saint Mary’s would be a good fit and that she would receive the educational accommodations she needed.“Iris made that transition very smooth with note takers, time-and-a-half on tests and a separate room for testing,” she said.Van Antwerp said she also records classes and uses audiobooks to learn material.“I maybe have to work two times harder to get the ‘A,’ but the accommodations don’t give me a leg up,” she said.She said most professors are very willing and able to work with her, but because teaching styles differ, Van Antwerp said she has had to advocate for herself and realize when she needs accommodations. One professor allowed her to record the classes and answer the essay tests orally instead of writing the essays.Van Antwerp said she learned to compensate for her dyslexia in high school because she didn’t have a resource coordinator like Giamo.“I had a lot of tutoring when I was little to teach me tools to combat my disability,” she said.It wasn’t until the end of her high school career, Van Antwerp said, that her school created a learning center for students with disabilities.“So I learned how to advocate for myself in the classroom in high school,” she said. “During tests, people would ask me why I wasn’t in the room, and I would tell them I receive accommodations. They would say ‘Really? You look smart.’ People didn’t understand. I’m not dumb.”Van Antwerp said she has become very comfortable talking about her disability.“There will always be kids who doubt you, but you just have to shake it off,” she said. “Sometimes other students are frustrated because they think educational accommodations make it easier.”Bridget Dedelow, a senior who has cerebral palsy, said the academic environment at Saint Mary’s encouraged her to explore disability in a nonfiction writing class.“Honestly, I wasn’t going to at first. It’s funny, because, with nonfiction, you think you’re telling other people’s stories,” she said. “I wanted to write other people’s stories and the project was setting itself up to be about geek culture.”Professors encouraged her to include herself in her writing project, Dedelow said, and she realized the connection between her interest in gaming and her disability.“I didn’t want to be defined by my disability, and I was nervous about exposing myself to these people that might not understand,” she said. “But writing about my disability was definitely a freeing experience, and an exercise in trusting myself and trusting my ability.”Through the revision process, Dedelow said she tried to find a balance of telling stories about geek culture and feminism, while incorporating her own acceptance of her disability through gaming.“My comp [class] was the first time I wrote peacefully and with humor,” Dedelow said. “I’ve had some angry writing in my life.”News writers Megan Valley and Madison Jaros contributed to this story.Tags: disability, Disability Resource Office, Disability series 2016, Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilitieslast_img read more

Melton, Randolph lead Florida A&M past SC State 62-56

first_imgThe Rattlers evened the season series against the Bulldogs with the win. South Carolina State defeated Florida A&M 81-65 on Jan. 18. Florida A&M finishes out the regular season against Bethune-Cookman on the road next Thursday. South Carolina State plays NC Central at home on Saturday.___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditTALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Rod Melton and MJ Randolph scored 15 points apiece and Florida A&M beat South Carolina State 60-54 on Monday night for its first undefeated season at home since 1988-89.Bryce Moragne added 14 points and Nasir Core had 10 for the Rattlers (12-14, 10-5 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference), who made 21 of 29 free throws in winning their eighth straight at home.Ian Kinar scored 10 with 14 rebounds and Damani Applewhite added 13 points for the Bulldogs (11-15, 6-8), who have lost three straight. Melton, Randolph lead Florida A&M past SC State 62-56 February 24, 2020 Associated Press last_img read more

SPILLANE: WATCHING DONEGAL PLAY IS LIKE WATCHING PAINT DRY, BUT THEN……!

first_imgFormer Kerry legend and RTE pundit Pat Spillane has said watching Donegal play is like watching paint dry.The outspoken commentator, who famously labeled Ulster football as “puke football’, launched another attack on Jim McGuinness’ men in his Sunday World newspaper column.But as well as slating Donegal, Spillane admits that he also admires Michael Murphy and co. Spillane used last weekend’s Ulster Final victory over Monaghan to judge Donegal.“There are people out there who enjoy watching paint dry. Then there are masochists who love having pain inflicted on them.“Unless you fit into either of these categories I don’t see how you could have enjoyed watching the first half of the Ulster Final. “It was dire, ultra defensive, negative and nasty,” he said.However he added “Having said that, one could only sit back and admire Donegal. They gave a masterclass in defensive play and work ethic.“The non-stop running play of the Donegal players was unbelievable.”He said that while he still believed the Donegal team of last year were “running on empty’ he believes that has changed.“They’re different this year – hungrier, sharper and working harder,” he said.And then he asked himself if Donegal are good enough to win the All Ireland saying he would love to see them meet Dublin in the semi-final. “I’m not so sure. I don’t think they are as god as they were in 2012. So I wouldn’t get carried away yet.“But Donegal have a system and it will test Dublin if they clash in the semi-final. I would love for this game to happen.“But if the game transpires, the key question is whether they can hold their blanket defense in place for the entire duration of the match when faced by Dublin’s unbelievable pace,” he added.SPILLANE: WATCHING DONEGAL PLAY IS LIKE WATCHING PAINT DRY, BUT THEN……! was last modified: July 27th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:all-irelanddonegalGAAJim McGuinnessPat Spillanelast_img read more